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Old 05-16-2012, 04:20 AM
Tepin Tepin is offline
 
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Default Random thought

I'm still an amateur when it comes to electrical and haven't come across this yet on a desktop so I thought I'd ask anyone with more experience.

My few experiences with laptops suggest that simply closing the circuit for the power switch with a jumper is enough evidence to diagnose a bad switch if you don't own a multimeter. I know I can simply test this in the shop tomorrow and I plan to, but I thought I'd post about it as well while it's on my mind.

I just realized that as much as I like to say a failed CPU is the rarest thing you'll find I think on desktops a failed switch is even more rare. I've replaced a handful of cpus over the years but 0 switches on desktops, and less switches on laptops after I (accidentally) took one apart and saw the corrosion that was preventing the metal cap from closing the circuit.

Last edited by Tepin; 05-16-2012 at 04:22 AM. Reason: Bad gramma.
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Old 05-16-2012, 04:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepin View Post
I'm still an amateur when it comes to electrical and haven't come across this yet on a desktop so I thought I'd ask anyone with more experience.

My few experiences with laptops suggest that simply closing the circuit for the power switch with a jumper is enough evidence to diagnose a bad switch if you don't own a multimeter. I know I can simply test this in the shop tomorrow and I plan to, but I thought I'd post about it as well while it's on my mind.

I just realized that as much as I like to say a failed CPU is the rarest thing you'll find I think on desktops a failed switch is even more rare. I've replaced a handful of cpus over the years but 0 switches on desktops, and less switches on laptops after I (accidentally) took one apart and saw the corrosion that was preventing the metal cap from closing the circuit.
You know, this would make a cool ongoing thread. I like these random thoughts. Would be interested in seeing more of same. Anyone?
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Old 05-16-2012, 04:42 AM
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I've replaced power buttons on about a dozen dell studios and gateway nv53 laptops. Buttons on the hinge is one of the dumbest ideas I've seen in computers. Granted these are usually the mount rather switch being broken, but I have seen a number of actual failed switches.
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Old 05-16-2012, 05:28 AM
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You might want to invest in a multimeter. Nothing special, just a cheap little job for testing continuity, power supplies, cables, etc. I don't care about accuracy as much as confirmation I'm on the right track troubleshooting.

It's easier for me to check to see if a voltage is there or if a switch works than guess or do some workaround.

Just another diagnostic tool to help do a better job.
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Old 05-16-2012, 01:20 PM
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Buttons on the hinge is one of the dumbest ideas I've seen in computers.
Yes, the NV5x series with the switch on the round part of the hinge is a real nightmare. Replacing just the guts with the wire is like $50 parts but if they crack the retaining circle they have to replace the top cover and/or the lcd bezel. A couple of times I drilled out the chassis and put a alternative switch in there instead of doing a $200 repair. Sony and Asus has a few like this as well.

I think laptop chassis are designed by insane people locked away in a lunatic asylum somewhere.
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Old 05-16-2012, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 16k_zx81 View Post
You know, this would make a cool ongoing thread. I like these random thoughts. Would be interested in seeing more of same. Anyone?
I agree wholeheartedly.
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Old 05-16-2012, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYJimbo View Post
I think laptop chassis are designed by insane people locked away in a lunatic asylum somewhere.
They seem to be mostly engineered to be assembled more efficiently rather than repaired efficiently. I do like what Apple has done since 2008 with the unibody laptops. They've actually provided the schematics in the service manuals for shorting the logic board to start the machine in the case of a stuck power button or blown switch. Makes them easy to troubleshoot. On the other hand, a repair is an entire top case/keyboard replacement (minus trackpad) and a complete tear down.
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Old 05-16-2012, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYJimbo View Post
Yes, the NV5x series with the switch on the round part of the hinge is a real nightmare. Replacing just the guts with the wire is like $50 parts but if they crack the retaining circle they have to replace the top cover and/or the lcd bezel. A couple of times I drilled out the chassis and put a alternative switch in there instead of doing a $200 repair. Sony and Asus has a few like this as well.

I think laptop chassis are designed by insane people locked away in a lunatic asylum somewhere.
Slightly off topic, but wow, there is a blast from the past NYJimbo.
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:28 PM
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+ 1 for the laptop design asylum.

I've had two late model dells recently that required complete teardown to access the hard drive. The drives are screwed to the bottom of the motherboard, with no access through the bottom of the case.

Both were under warranty, and I wanted to image the drives before the warranty repair. Completely reassembling a non-working computer just so the warranty guy can tear it apart again is maddening.
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Old 05-16-2012, 04:07 PM
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Yeah, pick up a $20 multimeter from the hardware store. It's a handy tool to have around the shop
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