Go Back   Technibble Forums > Technical Discussions > Networking

  Technibble Sponsor

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 05-15-2012, 01:59 PM
angry_geek's Avatar
angry_geek angry_geek is online now
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: herrin, il
Posts: 2,798
angry_geek is a jewel in the roughangry_geek is a jewel in the roughangry_geek is a jewel in the rough
Send a message via MSN to angry_geek
Default

It's not a problem on the different circuits as long as the voltage stays the same. Once you try to hop panels, you'll have issues. Distance is an issue as well. I have one set up at my folks' house. The first unit is in a bedroom at one end of the house; the second is behind the TV in the living room at the other end of the house. Different circuits and nearly 100' away. I've had no problems at all with this setup. You want to be sure the house wiring is properly grounded and you have adequate surge protection. You're putting your electronics at considerable risk otherwise. I'm not sure of all the technical details, but, basically, they're designed to operate on a 120 volt electrical network (US) at 60 hertz. Make sure to do some line tests at the outlets to confirm the electrical system isn't wonky, or you'll have all kinds of issues.
__________________
Loring Preston
The Computer Doctor
Email Me

Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-15-2012, 04:00 PM
mraikes's Avatar
mraikes mraikes is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 1,734
mraikes is a jewel in the roughmraikes is a jewel in the roughmraikes is a jewel in the roughmraikes is a jewel in the rough
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by angry_geek View Post
It's not a problem on the different circuits as long as the voltage stays the same. Once you try to hop panels, you'll have issues. Distance is an issue as well. I have one set up at my folks' house. The first unit is in a bedroom at one end of the house; the second is behind the TV in the living room at the other end of the house. Different circuits and nearly 100' away. I've had no problems at all with this setup. You want to be sure the house wiring is properly grounded and you have adequate surge protection. You're putting your electronics at considerable risk otherwise. I'm not sure of all the technical details, but, basically, they're designed to operate on a 120 volt electrical network (US) at 60 hertz. Make sure to do some line tests at the outlets to confirm the electrical system isn't wonky, or you'll have all kinds of issues.

This is what I've found as well. I use powerline adapters myself and have set them up for a small number of clients. They've all worked very well.

The only thing I noticed was in my own home where I had the time and freedom to experiment. I seemed to get a slightly better (faster) connection between two particular outlets - but not enough to really matter.

Regarding the "why not just use wifi?" question, MY experience with powerline adapters is that they just plain work with no end user intervention, passwords to remember, reboots required, settings to change/update, etc. Once they're all setup they're an "out of sight, out of mind" solution for extending a network. Plus in many cases they result in faster connections than typical home wifi.

They're not the answer to every situation, but there's no reason to avoid them in circumstances where they are clearly a good alternative.
__________________
----------------------------
Darn-Computer! Computer & Laptop Repair

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a ukulele. And that's pretty close." Thomas Jefferson
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-15-2012, 09:40 PM
katz katz is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 789
katz is on a distinguished road
Default

My local BB/Staples has a Netgear powerline adapter kit for around $70, but in the requirements it lists Windows XP, Vista 32-bit, Vista 64-bit compatibility only. Will I have a problem with Win 7...
__________________
Nothing to see here... :(
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-15-2012, 09:45 PM
cprompt's Avatar
cprompt cprompt is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Kingfield, Maine
Posts: 173
cprompt is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by katz View Post
My local BB/Staples has a Netgear powerline adapter kit for around $70, but in the requirements it lists Windows XP, Vista 32-bit, Vista 64-bit compatibility only. Will I have a problem with Win 7...
Why don't you ask the Easy Tech or Geek Squad associate? After all they are the "professionals". .
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-15-2012, 10:19 PM
YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
YeOldeStonecat YeOldeStonecat is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Southeast Connecticut
Posts: 7,413
YeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to all
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by katz View Post
My local BB/Staples has a Netgear powerline adapter kit for around $70, but in the requirements it lists Windows XP, Vista 32-bit, Vista 64-bit compatibility only. Will I have a problem with Win 7...
Shouldn't...Vista and Win7 aren't all too different network stack wise. Heck..the ones I'm using right now in my home office to unbuckle/build an Untangle firewall to deploy at a school tomorrow...I have the Untangle firewalls WAN port uplinked to my router it the basement using a pair of older Linksys 2nd generation powerline adapters...they came out when Win2K and WinXP were the norm. I've also had my Win7 64 bit rig gaming through them. Right now Untangle is running through them even though they don't say Debian compatible.

The compatibility issue comes up more regarding the software used to setup/config the units when first setup.
__________________
Resident "Geek on a Harley" doing IT in Southeast Connecticut
http://www.dynamic-alliance.com/
https://www.facebook.com/YeOldeStonecat

Last edited by YeOldeStonecat; 05-15-2012 at 10:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-17-2012, 11:17 AM
katz katz is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 789
katz is on a distinguished road
Default

Update - I picked up the Netgear 85Mbps Powerline Network Adapter Kit - XETB1001, comes with (2) adapters.

http://www.amazon.com/Netgear-85Mbps...7253153&sr=8-1

They connected up great, no issues. However, I did some internet speed tests using them and the results were not what I had hoped for.

I typically get 12-15 Mbps on my wired connections in the house, and with these adapters I am getting 1 - 1.5 Mbps. Is this the norm with these things?

I know there may be variables, such as circuit noise, etc., but I was really expecting faster speeds than this.

The customer probably won't have an issue with them, since they are using Satellite internet which is slow as molasses anyway, but I personally wouldn't be happy with speeds like that.
__________________
Nothing to see here... :(
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-17-2012, 11:26 AM
YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
YeOldeStonecat YeOldeStonecat is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Southeast Connecticut
Posts: 7,413
YeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to allYeOldeStonecat is a name known to all
Default

Not the norm....my old linksys pair....I pull all 18 megs of my 18 meg U-Verse connection through them as if I were plugged right into my router. And in the house I was in prior to this one...an old old farmhouse where I spanned 3x floors with them through old mix-matched wiring...I pulled all 8 of my 8 meg cable connection.
__________________
Resident "Geek on a Harley" doing IT in Southeast Connecticut
http://www.dynamic-alliance.com/
https://www.facebook.com/YeOldeStonecat
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05-17-2012, 12:25 PM
katz katz is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 789
katz is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
Not the norm....my old linksys pair....I pull all 18 megs of my 18 meg U-Verse connection through them as if I were plugged right into my router. And in the house I was in prior to this one...an old old farmhouse where I spanned 3x floors with them through old mix-matched wiring...I pulled all 8 of my 8 meg cable connection.
Wow, that's great.

Any ideas on what to look for with the slow speeds I am getting? I picked them up at BB - I suppose I could try to exchange them for another set in case I got a bad one.
__________________
Nothing to see here... :(
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05-17-2012, 04:20 PM
mjbasford mjbasford is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Williamsburg, VA USA
Posts: 149
mjbasford is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

If they are the powerline carriers that utilize x-10 or circuit transmission technology, they would have to be on the same phase of power. You could install a phase coupler to overcome this issue however. Sounds like you might be on different phases and that is what is killing your overall speed.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 05-17-2012, 08:44 PM
katz katz is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 789
katz is on a distinguished road
Default

It turned out to be a defective set; I swapped them for another set & now I am getting top speeds that are just as fast as the wired connections directly to the router.

Thanks to all for the replies. This will be a lot easier for the customer than messing around with router settings.
__________________
Nothing to see here... :(
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Technibble.com is based out of MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA.