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Old 03-10-2012, 12:33 AM
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Default Desktop Processor Overheating Problem

I have a custom built desktop PC with an Asus motherboard and an AMD 939 processor that I have not been able to track down the cause of the processor overheating. Just allowing the unit to sit idle it's not a huge issue. The minute I start using a browser or other software, which puts a load on it, the temperature starts climbing to as high as 250 degrees Fahrenheit and ultimately shuts down. I've never gotten a BSOD, or noticed the speed of the computer getting slower, just temp rising quickly, then shutdown.
This is one of my personal computers, so I haven't really spent allot of time on it, nor am I too worried about fixing it, because it's an older machine anyways. The only reason I'd like to figure it out is because I may one day face a similar issue with a client's PC.
I have taken this PC completely apart, cleaned EVERYTHING, replaced/added case fans, swapped memory modules, replaced the power supply, cleaned and reapplied thermal paste (arctic silver) to the processor numerous times, replaced the processor heat-sink and fan with a new one, and even replaced the heat-sink hold down with an identical one from another motherboard.
With replacing just about everything in this unit, except the motherboard, processor, hard drive, and case, I can not see anything else that could be bad other than the motherboard or processor. I did notice that when I replaced the heat-sink hold down it did help a little at first but then gradually started getting worse again over time.
Has anyone ever seen a processor with a surface defect that could be causing this problem? One that could cause enough of a gap between the processor and heat-sink that would cause it to overheat? Or could it actually be a bad motherboard or HDD?
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaDes View Post
I have a custom built desktop PC with an Asus motherboard and an AMD 939 processor that I have not been able to track down the cause of the processor overheating. Just allowing the unit to sit idle it's not a huge issue. The minute I start using a browser or other software, which puts a load on it, the temperature starts climbing to as high as 250 degrees Fahrenheit and ultimately shuts down. I've never gotten a BSOD, or noticed the speed of the computer getting slower, just temp rising quickly, then shutdown.
This is one of my personal computers, so I haven't really spent allot of time on it, nor am I too worried about fixing it, because it's an older machine anyways. The only reason I'd like to figure it out is because I may one day face a similar issue with a client's PC.
I have taken this PC completely apart, cleaned EVERYTHING, replaced/added case fans, swapped memory modules, replaced the power supply, cleaned and reapplied thermal paste (arctic silver) to the processor numerous times, replaced the processor heat-sink and fan with a new one, and even replaced the heat-sink hold down with an identical one from another motherboard.
With replacing just about everything in this unit, except the motherboard, processor, hard drive, and case, I can not see anything else that could be bad other than the motherboard or processor. I did notice that when I replaced the heat-sink hold down it did help a little at first but then gradually started getting worse again over time.
Has anyone ever seen a processor with a surface defect that could be causing this problem? One that could cause enough of a gap between the processor and heat-sink that would cause it to overheat? Or could it actually be a bad motherboard or HDD?
I've seen setups that prevent a proper seal from forming, air pockets suck for that.

Otherwise, does the fan speed up as the processor overheats, before shutdown? Might be a problem with the settings there, or a sensor.
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Old 03-10-2012, 01:46 AM
HFultzjr HFultzjr is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaDes View Post
I have a custom built desktop PC with an Asus motherboard and an AMD 939 processor that I have not been able to track down the cause of the processor overheating. Just allowing the unit to sit idle it's not a huge issue. The minute I start using a browser or other software, which puts a load on it, the temperature starts climbing to as high as 250 degrees Fahrenheit and ultimately shuts down. I've never gotten a BSOD, or noticed the speed of the computer getting slower, just temp rising quickly, then shutdown.
This is one of my personal computers, so I haven't really spent allot of time on it, nor am I too worried about fixing it, because it's an older machine anyways. The only reason I'd like to figure it out is because I may one day face a similar issue with a client's PC.
I have taken this PC completely apart, cleaned EVERYTHING, replaced/added case fans, swapped memory modules, replaced the power supply, cleaned and reapplied thermal paste (arctic silver) to the processor numerous times, replaced the processor heat-sink and fan with a new one, and even replaced the heat-sink hold down with an identical one from another motherboard.
With replacing just about everything in this unit, except the motherboard, processor, hard drive, and case, I can not see anything else that could be bad other than the motherboard or processor. I did notice that when I replaced the heat-sink hold down it did help a little at first but then gradually started getting worse again over time.
Has anyone ever seen a processor with a surface defect that could be causing this problem? One that could cause enough of a gap between the processor and heat-sink that would cause it to overheat? Or could it actually be a bad motherboard or HDD?
Don't know if this is relevant or not, but here is a post I found a while ago about a similiar issue. Might get you headed in the right direction.

But there is a factor I just found out about, by chance, yesterday: If your CPU supports AMD Cool & Quiet, it must first be enabled in the BIOS (it must also be supported by the motherboard). But this is not enough - you must also select the option "minimal power management" in:
"Start > Control Panel > Performance and Maintenance > Power Options".
I believe CPU fan control must also be enabled in the BIOS power tab.
The only place I have seen this written was in an ASUS motherboard manual. We also have a Gigabyte, and there is no mention of it. Of course, if you Google "Cool & quiet" + "minimal power management", you get 10000+ results - but this is working backwards, after you already know about it. My other Google searches trying to lower idle temps did not lead me to it.
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carrcomp View Post
I've seen setups that prevent a proper seal from forming, air pockets suck for that.

Otherwise, does the fan speed up as the processor overheats, before shutdown? Might be a problem with the settings there, or a sensor.
All the the fan seems to operate as they should, this is what makes the problem so mind boggling. As far as the sensor being bad, is their a way to check it during system operation? The only way I know it's running so hot is because of what "core temp" is reporting, which I presume uses stats from the sensor.
As far as the processor actually being bad, I researched that for months and never got anywhere, other than people saying they have never heard of a bad processor causing itself to overheat, even with proper cooling.
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by AlaDes View Post
All the the fan seems to operate as they should, this is what makes the problem so mind boggling. As far as the sensor being bad, is their a way to check it during system operation? The only way I know it's running so hot is because of what "core temp" is reporting, which I presume uses stats from the sensor.
As far as the processor actually being bad, I researched that for months and never got anywhere, other than people saying they have never heard of a bad processor causing itself to overheat, even with proper cooling.
If the core temp is showing it as going up, and it shuts down at a logical temp, then yeah the sensor is fine.

Although I will say, the fans running fine would also mean that they would try to ramp up a bit as the temperature goes up, so perhaps the fan is set to a low RPM?

I know it's a long shot, but this is a wierd one for me.
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:37 AM
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Originally Posted by carrcomp View Post
If the core temp is showing it as going up, and it shuts down at a logical temp, then yeah the sensor is fine.

Although I will say, the fans running fine would also mean that they would try to ramp up a bit as the temperature goes up, so perhaps the fan is set to a low RPM?

I know it's a long shot, but this is a wierd one for me.
I've tried the bios setting different ways and it really doesn't matter. The system still overheats and shuts down. Another theory I've had is that maybe the board is a little warped and causing a small air pocket between the processor and heat-sink?
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HFultzjr View Post
Don't know if this is relevant or not, but here is a post I found a while ago about a similiar issue. Might get you headed in the right direction.

But there is a factor I just found out about, by chance, yesterday: If your CPU supports AMD Cool & Quiet, it must first be enabled in the BIOS (it must also be supported by the motherboard). But this is not enough - you must also select the option "minimal power management" in:
"Start > Control Panel > Performance and Maintenance > Power Options".
I believe CPU fan control must also be enabled in the BIOS power tab.
The only place I have seen this written was in an ASUS motherboard manual. We also have a Gigabyte, and there is no mention of it. Of course, if you Google "Cool & quiet" + "minimal power management", you get 10000+ results - but this is working backwards, after you already know about it. My other Google searches trying to lower idle temps did not lead me to it.
My board does have the "Cool & Quiet" feature and everything is set the way it should be, except the Power Options which I just did. The only thing I had to change on the power saver in my case was the standby feature because I need access to it 24/7 sometimes. I'll let you know how it works after I do an update, which usually results in overheating and the a shutdown
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Old 03-10-2012, 11:13 AM
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Does the heat sink seem to fit tight on the processor? If it moves easily there could be an issue of proper contact with the mating surfaces.

Just for giggles, I would "dress" the heatsink; Using fine sandpaper/emory paper on a flat surface (glass, flat metal bench top, etc.).

Draw an "X" w/ magic marker across the surface of the heatsink, sand it on the flat surface until the X is done & the go w/ higher grades of sandpaper until you get a nice smooth finish.

That will allow for the closest fit to the processor w/ minimal paste needed. I address a finicky overheat issue a couple of years ago this way & had no issues since. It's worth a try.
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:04 PM
HFultzjr HFultzjr is offline
 
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Originally Posted by katz View Post
Does the heat sink seem to fit tight on the processor? If it moves easily there could be an issue of proper contact with the mating surfaces.

Just for giggles, I would "dress" the heatsink; Using fine sandpaper/emory paper on a flat surface (glass, flat metal bench top, etc.).

Draw an "X" w/ magic marker across the surface of the heatsink, sand it on the flat surface until the X is done & the go w/ higher grades of sandpaper until you get a nice smooth finish.

That will allow for the closest fit to the processor w/ minimal paste needed. I address a finicky overheat issue a couple of years ago this way & had no issues since. It's worth a try.
As I final polishing step, you may want to try some automotive rubbing compound or jeweler's rouge.....both very fine abrasives for a finishing touch when used with a cloth such as on old 100% cotton T-shirt.
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Old 03-10-2012, 03:43 PM
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AlaDes AlaDes is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katz View Post
Does the heat sink seem to fit tight on the processor? If it moves easily there could be an issue of proper contact with the mating surfaces.
Yes, it fits very tight. As a matter of fact, the first time I changed the heat-sink hold down was because one of the ears broke, causing the unit to overheat, and then shutting down. After replacing the hold down it would still get hot and shut down while under a full load, so I tried using fine sandpaper to the bottom of the hold down as a means of getting a tighter fit but after about 15 minutes one of the ears broke again, which means it was probably too tight.

Quote:
Just for giggles, I would "dress" the heatsink; Using fine sandpaper/emory paper on a flat surface (glass, flat metal bench top, etc.).

Draw an "X" w/ magic marker across the surface of the heatsink, sand it on the flat surface until the X is done & the go w/ higher grades of sandpaper until you get a nice smooth finish.

That will allow for the closest fit to the processor w/ minimal paste needed. I address a finicky overheat issue a couple of years ago this way & had no issues since. It's worth a try.
I never really thought of that but it's definitely worth a try I will try it either tonight or tomorrow and let you know how it goes. I guess the only reason I never thought of trying it is because it's about the fourth heat-sink (2 AMD OEM, 2 Coolermasters) I've put on it and still no luck
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