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  #11  
Old 07-04-2012, 03:27 PM
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Why go to Home Depot, Lowes?

Find electrical supply store for commercial grade AND cheaper supply, ALWAYS.
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  #12  
Old 07-04-2012, 03:31 PM
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Why go to Home Depot, Lowes?

Find electrical supply store for commercial grade AND cheaper supply, ALWAYS.
My experience is....the local Electricians supply stores are always substantially (and I've been in all the local ones)....huge big time substantially more expensive. Especially if you are "joe public" walking in off the street. They typically discount and give breaks to regular electricians that have house accounts there...but even those electricians tell me the local shops are ripoffs..they just go there when they need something quick/immediately.
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  #13  
Old 07-04-2012, 04:03 PM
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Here's a nice list of vendors, open your account through your business, save money.

http://6hrev.com/ma-electrical-suppliers

I'm in Toronto area, go to Sayal, you don't need an account to shop discount prices there.
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  #14  
Old 07-04-2012, 06:47 PM
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Grainger carries Ideal, Klein, and Paladin which are all good crimpers between $50 and $100. Grainger is usually less than Lowes and Home Depot.

You also need a Punch-Down tool.
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  #15  
Old 07-05-2012, 04:34 AM
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I just did some substantial wiring for a country club. This was a 19th century farm house with like 10 additions on it so I hired a sub contractor. We worked together on this as pulling wire is MUCH easier with two people. I also got a class C contractor's licence for low voltage wiring when I started my shop over a year ago.

I used Cat 6 CMP and Cat6 jacks. There is a special type of twine used for pulling wire. I left one at every pull I made. This way I did not have to use up the wire leaving a run, but if something happens to a run, I can pull another one without bothering my subcontrator again.

When I ran wires at my old IT job, we had hollow metal stud walls and a drop ceiling. Easy easy.

My recommendations to you are: Use a good drill bit on the stud running along the top of the wall. A bad bit can slice into your wire making your run useless. A good step bit can be useful here.

Pull more than you need and put a few extra feet in the wall. I would hate to re-run a wire because I did not have enough to terminate it properly.

Don't just lie the wire on the drop ceiling. Get some baling wire or what not and make loops to hold the wires above the drop ceiling, florescent lights, and anything else.

Don't be shy about moving the tiles, but watch how dirty your hands get while you touch the tiles as it is easy to leave dirty handprints behind. ALSO, don't put them back until you are done in that section.

Pull it once and do it right! Use CAT6, use the right type of wire(CM/CMR/CMP). Wiring is expensive labor wise, so show them the value of what you did by not having to go back again and again. Also, future proof it as much as you can.

I might think of a few more things but this is what I have now.

EDIT: Use low voltage boxes, they make life easy! http://knoji.com/images/user/low-voltage-open-box.jpg

Last edited by Rob_NNCC; 07-05-2012 at 04:36 AM. Reason: added low volt box
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  #16  
Old 07-05-2012, 06:30 AM
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You had better do the job right. I get pissed off everytime I see a job done wrong.

1. Get any necessary licence and read the EIA/TIA 568 codes to become familiar with 568A and 568B.

2. Unless Government or a strange request stick with 568A for the Keystone jacks, RJ45 Modplugs, and patch panels!

3. Get a Quality 110 Punchdown tool such as the Harris (i.e. $50+)

4. Get a quality ratcheting Crimping tool like the AMP crimp tool.

5. CAT5, 5e, and 6 are all different certification levels. You MUST use the same grade (patch pannels, keystone jacks, mod plugs, and cable). I.e. If you use all CAT6 cable and CAT6 Patch pannel then use a CAT5 keystone jack, that is only CAT5 wiring.

6. Do NOT ever splice wire or make connectors to extend a run... Instead, pull a new cable if you must.

7. Always use quality parts like Levitron and Gigamax. Never use something like a cheap $2 keystone jack!

8. ALWAYS leave several extra feet of cabling in every junction box... ALWAYS. If your port is broken (years later) and you get called back or another contractor gets called in because the port won't work... you will NEED to most likely replace the keystone jack. It is an EASY 5 minute fix if you left extra cable in the box. If there is only 4" of cable, it is going to be TOUGH and you MIGHT have to re-pull the entire run!

9. The most expensive cable run is the one that is 1" too short!

10. Use a cable verifyer to test EVERY connection!

11. Label EVERY pull with a professional laber. EACH faceplate should state A) Which IDF/MDF Room, so there is no guessing where the patch panel is! B) Each port (Keystone Jack) should state specifically which it is on the patch panel! (i.e. B-2)

If I walk up to a port I setup and need to patch it, It might say IDF-302, and I KNOW it is Room 302! Next, if it says B-7, I KNOW to find patch panel B then locate port 7.

12. Each port on the patch panel MUST state the room it is in. If I am in the IDF patching a port, the patch panels themselves should be labeled A, B, C, etc. They already come labeled 1,2, 3... 48 from the manufacturer. Therefore next to each one you put the ROOM Number.

So in the example above if I am in Room 302 looking at Patch Panel B and look at port 7, it would have the Room number that actually has that port.

13. Do NOT use network cable with snag-less boots with a patch panel or the switch. Those should ONLY be used from the port to the computer (and only if you really want too). Patch panels should have bootless cables only. It is a LOT of work to remove cables when there are 96 of them booted and you can't get your fingers behind both sides because they are so close together. Then the added force may break the switch or port on the patch panel leaving you with a loose connection.

14. NEVER reuse a patch panel or keystone jack! The connections will NOT be tight enough to keep corrosive air out and prevent corrosion. Sure, it may work perfect when you are there, but what about 1 year later when a tiny bit of invisible/microscopic rust forms between the connections making it intermitant (i.e. Only work when someone jiggles the cable???)
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  #17  
Old 07-05-2012, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
My experience is....the local Electricians supply stores are always substantially (and I've been in all the local ones)....huge big time substantially more expensive. Especially if you are "joe public" walking in off the street. They typically discount and give breaks to regular electricians that have house accounts there...but even those electricians tell me the local shops are ripoffs..they just go there when they need something quick/immediately.
Interesting. Typically we can pick up 1000' boxes of plenum and riser cable at Greybar and Rexel for about 30% less than HD or Lowes will charge. Same for RJ45 tips, biscuit jacks and keystones. Not as cheap as buying online, of course, but in a pinch it doesn't hurt so bad when you need a box on the quick.

Also, it seems telecom and data is exempt in MA from low voltage licensing. But that's just from a cursory read through of the statutes. Might want to double check. Otherwise, follow the majority of the advice in this thread.
- Always pull 2 drops instead of 1
- Check your punchdowns with a wiremapping network tester
- Be sure to label your jacks at the wall and the 110 panel
- Use pull string
- Leave a service loop in the wall
- Know your local wire code in regards to fire foam/putty, etc
etc

Oh, but use T568B...it's a lot more common than A, and any followup network techs will appreciate it.
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  #18  
Old 07-05-2012, 12:32 PM
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Oh, but use T568B...it's a lot more common than A, and any followup network techs will appreciate it.
Yup, here in the US....B is the common one. Of the hundreds of networks I've done/taken over/worked on...I've seen A pattern once.
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  #19  
Old 07-05-2012, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
Yup, here in the US....B is the common one. Of the hundreds of networks I've done/taken over/worked on...I've seen A pattern once.
"A" is standard for res. "B" is for Commercial, except gov still uses "A" (Or at least the IRS and SS buildings we've done).

Nothing peeves me off more than cabling done wrong, use cable hangers in the ceiling, cables can NOT just lie across the ceiling (whenever possible), run all cables together for as long as possible, and in a grid like layout, ALWAYS easier and safer to use 2 people, make sure and leave at least 3' extra cable on every run, ALWAYS punch to code( and NEC) - nothing worse than an inch of stripped cable hanging out of the back of a jack!, NEVER split lines (2 units to 1 cable), if a cable gets sliced re-pull, don't use cheap chinese cable, use quality cable (Belden is always good for me), also use quality connectors, I buy some online and get some locally (greybar etc...).
Also ALWAYS use LV boxes in the walls, and put in a rack with a patch panel.

If you are at all unsure..... don't do it, contract it out. When I started cabling I read all the NEC and other state and federal codes and standards. Then I cabled my offices and then started doing sites, most recently we did one that was over 75,000 feet of cat5e.... that was a nice 125hrs of work! (Including a server move, new POS, new copiers etc...).
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  #20  
Old 07-05-2012, 05:34 PM
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"A" is standard for res. "B" is for Commercial, except gov still uses "A" (Or at least the IRS and SS buildings we've done).
I've never heard of any preference...like res or gov. Back when doing my cert classes with Leviton, they even said in the US it's 99.99999% B, other countries you can find A.

Even the wiring guys we sub work to...it's all B regardless of type of installation.
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