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Old 05-23-2012, 09:47 PM
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Default Low temp alloys for special case electrical soldering

Is anyone here playing around with low temp alloys for doing critical resoldering, touchup or bridging jobs where you do not want to disturb existing solder or damaged pads ? I have been playing with various alloys and am trying to find a nice combination of low temp, good wetting, good strength and reasonable flexibility. Of course they must be non-acid and good conductive as well as bond well to copper and aluminum.

I always get the "I tried to fix it myself" jobs, sometimes they break a connector where the pins themselves snap and you have old solder on the board with half the pins and the rest on the connector but using the "regular" stuff is either too hot or not wetting enough or too brittle. If you can fix the break you save so much work getting parts or tossing a mobo. I've done bridging with bismuth but its very brittle and sooner or later a good "bang" will break the bridge. I really dont want to have to keep buying spools of stuff just to throw it out.

Somebody has to have that perfect fine wire, preferably a no clean flux core.
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Old 05-23-2012, 10:01 PM
altrenda altrenda is online now
 
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I used this on a special job where no replacement board was available for a piece of process control equipment and it worked well.

Not cheap though. And takes a while to cure.

http://www.amazon.com/Chemicals-Silv.../dp/B003BDMJSY
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Old 05-23-2012, 10:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by altrenda View Post
I used this on a special job where no replacement board was available for a piece of process control equipment and it worked well.

Not cheap though. And takes a while to cure.

http://www.amazon.com/Chemicals-Silv.../dp/B003BDMJSY
Thank you for the reply, thats a good choice for bigger jobs where you want an electrical conduit, but I am really looking for very small solder jobs, where you can't just dab something because the pins are too close together. Chip level stuff. Like a 8 pin connector for a power button, all 8 pins are in a half inch wide connection area, but they must be isolated from each other.
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:54 PM
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Plain old 60/40 solder works fine for me. For bridging gaps/breaks, I solder in a piece of 30 Ga. wire, especially if there will be any board flexing. For repairing legs on ICs without removing and replacing the IC, maybe try 60/40 solder paste. I don't know.
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