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Old 12-15-2010, 11:25 PM
archie42 archie42 is offline
 
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Default Too old at 40 ?????

Hello,
I have been in the IT industry for over 20 years. 95% of my suppliers who existed in year 2000 do not exist today!

Started out as a small business - selling PCs, fixing PCs, upgrades, and also Sales. Since the late 80s. Business had its ups and downs. Best year 1997 - made over $100,000- The following year shrank to $35,000-

Moved into corporate clients/business clients - sold services (PC maintenance, upgrades) and sales. From 1994 till 1999.

Went into training - ran my own PC Training classes in 1996 with the release of Windows 95. Ran weekend course from 9:00am till 4:00pm for around $95! Still difficult to complete against the TAFE courses!

Sold PCs, fixed PCs etc.....

Y2K came and went....

Closed down my business in 1999/2000 after over 12 years in business for myself - moved into IT Contracting.

I am from Australia and in year 2000 the government introduced a GST (goods and services tax to replace the traditional sales tax model). Got work for a year!

Moved into IT Support - Helpdesk, Desktop support......

Held many positions including being a Team leader for KBR in IT. The project had 3 other IT people with me being in charge. Position was "project hire" and was great while it lasted (nearly 3 years). Got a nice bonus at the end....

Then went into contracting again...

STARTING TO GET THE "you are too experienced.... ie TOO OLD" reply now.

This is the way IT is.......

Unless you are working for yourself.... you are too old after 39!

IT is a young mans game.......

In IT 40 is 50 !

HENCE THE REASON I THINK I SHOULD WORK FOR MYSELF AGAIN!
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Old 12-16-2010, 01:00 AM
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K007 K007 is offline
 
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There are many criteria when it comes to experience and the position to be filled, but one aspect is this:
The pay that comes with the position should make the applicant excited and willing to bust his ass for the money. An applicant with enough experience for better paid positions, will not be happy with his pay. I know, they all say they will, but fast forward 6 months into the job, and they start whining, or not working at their full capacity, seeking promotions without being offered one, making decisions that were not part of their duty list, and the list goes on.
In short, they become hard to manage, and whatever their worth, is less than the stress they cause. Getting fired from a permanent position based on those arguments is almost impossible. The only way is to filter them out before they are hired.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:40 AM
baccart baccart is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K007 View Post
There are many criteria when it comes to experience and the position to be filled, but one aspect is this:
The pay that comes with the position should make the applicant excited and willing to bust his ass for the money. An applicant with enough experience for better paid positions, will not be happy with his pay. I know, they all say they will, but fast forward 6 months into the job, and they start whining, or not working at their full capacity, seeking promotions without being offered one, making decisions that were not part of their duty list, and the list goes on.
In short, they become hard to manage, and whatever their worth, is less than the stress they cause. Getting fired from a permanent position based on those arguments is almost impossible. The only way is to filter them out before they are hired.

tears. Only If someone explained it to me earlier.
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Old 12-16-2010, 08:18 AM
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MobileTechie MobileTechie is offline
 
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Most firms are chasing the same type of person. They want people who progress at a fast rate with no hiccups. They expect you to be at a certain level for your age and experience. They dont like people taking time out, being behind, changing direction and so on.
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Old 12-16-2010, 08:36 AM
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I'm glad I don't have that worry. I took redundancy at 58 and started up on my own rather that either try and get a job in IT and get knocked back or take a job(at best) that has no 'thinking' to it
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Old 12-16-2010, 09:35 AM
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I worked IT recruitment for many, many years and in my experience most, but not all, firms have a pretty narrow view on the type of CV they are willing to consider. The idea of actually giving somebody time to get into a role or, god forbid, actually training anyone is out of the question. They'd rather hire someone from abroad than do that.

As recruiters we learned to bin CVs that weren't "clean" after a quick glance because no matter how convinced we might be that the guy was actually ideal, we'd only get in trouble with the client for wasting their time. By clean I mean 2:1 or better in a relevant subject from a recognised Uni, logical career progression in relevant and/or big named firms, no less than 2 years in any one job and preferably no more than 5 unless they were whizzing through the ranks, no gaps, and no "time out".

The contract market is more forgiving for older folk or people with more diverse experience, as long are you're energetic enough and happen to have the right sort of skills.
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Old 12-16-2010, 09:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MobileTechie View Post
I worked IT recruitment for many, many years and in my experience most, but not all, firms have a pretty narrow view on the type of CV they are willing to consider. The idea of actually giving somebody time to get into a role or, god forbid, actually training anyone is out of the question. They'd rather hire someone from abroad than do that.

As recruiters we learned to bin CVs that weren't "clean" after a quick glance because no matter how convinced we might be that the guy was actually ideal, we'd only get in trouble with the client for wasting their time. By clean I mean 2:1 or better in a relevant subject from a recognised Uni, logical career progression in relevant and/or big named firms, no less than 2 years in any one job and preferably no more than 5 unless they were whizzing through the ranks, no gaps, and no "time out".

The contract market is more forgiving for older folk or people with more diverse experience, as long are you're energetic enough and happen to have the right sort of skills.
I did think about contracting so I'll see how we go. My work record is that I have never failed an interview bar one that was advertised in the Daily Express 30+ years ago. Then I got to the final two. I don't want to start failing now
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