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View Full Version : Being called a technician


dicklaw18
06-13-2007, 09:35 AM
Hello, what does everyone think about this. Do you think its right to call yourself a technician if you have no certifications or degrees but just have a good knowledge of computers?

Blues
06-13-2007, 02:37 PM
To me it depends on the tasks you are doing not your certifications

Bryce W
06-13-2007, 05:10 PM
I voted yes, if you are doing technician work, know what you are doing and been hired as a technician, then yes your a technician.

Mac
06-13-2007, 08:15 PM
Well i have absolutly no formal quallifications what so ever. I learn this stuff because its my passion. Some nights i dont sleep at all just staying up reading/coding/learning. While other people with formal quallifications may do it because they have to. To get a nice cushy job and earn some good $$$.

Is it right to call them technicians ?

This game changes so fast you have to love it or you wont keep up & you cant teach skill ;)

MrMille
06-14-2007, 04:40 AM
In Germany titles such as Engineer are legally protected, so you can't tell people you're an Engineer unless you have studied for 4 or 5 years and qualified.

I don't think the term Technician is legally protected, so anyone can say they are.

Whether that is morally correct is another thing!
To be fair, as you are a contributor to technibble, I think it's reasonable to call yourself a techy! :)

Bryce W
06-15-2007, 12:31 AM
Well i have absolutly no formal quallifications what so ever. I learn this stuff because its my passion. Some nights i dont sleep at all just staying up reading/coding/learning. While other people with formal quallifications may do it because they have to. To get a nice cushy job and earn some good $$$.

Is it right to call them technicians ?

This game changes so fast you have to love it or you wont keep up & you cant teach skill ;)
Well said. I have had techie conversations with many people who are formally qualified who know the basics and the practical work, but dont know how to fix something when it goes wrong. Alot of the time it doesn't "go by the book". You have to have a bit of knowlege in all areas and keep up with the game because it moves so fast to fix things like Mac said.

Mac, id call you a techie :)

greggh
06-15-2007, 07:17 AM
I voted yes (as everyone has so far.) I don't actually care to much about certifications. In my experience so far people who are completely self-taught are far better trouble shooters than the ones who have a ton of schooling and certifications. Our company is a decent size right now and I know we only have two guys with any certifications at all. We only have those because we needed a couple certified people to get certain Microsoft partnerships, so we asked a couple of our guys to go and take the tests.

PorterComp
07-04-2007, 06:25 PM
Technician? Nah..Engineer? Doctor? Computer Master?

I don't think it matters what you are called. No matter how many certifications you have or don't have, if you don't have the talent or ability to do the job, what does it matter.

When someone asks me what I do, I tell them...I'm THE Computer guy:cool:

b_jonston
07-08-2007, 09:22 AM
I personally feel you can be called whatever you want to be called. Technician or Engineer.

A Technician is: An expert in a technique
An Engineer is: to design or create using the techniques or methods of engineering

(I did choose the definitions that supported my point :))

I view it as you make your own title. If your a technian, you can fix things. If your an engineer, you design things. I personally have not obtained a bachelors degree to be an engineer but I do plan and implement network configurations. By my definition, I'm an engineer.

my 2 cents...

Nice topic, though. I've been debating to call myself a technician or an engineer, myself.

AnotherTechGuy
07-08-2007, 10:40 AM
Hello, what does everyone think about this. Do you think its right to call yourself a technician if you have no certifications or degrees but just have a good knowledge of computers?

Hey guys being new to the Forum and just being me I couldn't resist this one..

I started doing PC work back in 1983, over the years I was self trained then the Army sent me to a Information Technologies Specialist course for a few weeks.
Then later on I got my A+ Cert: I am the Service Manager and Lead (Computer) Technician for a Computer repair company in my home town (See Profile this Forum)

tech·ni·cian (tk-nshn)
n.

One whose occupation requires training in a specific technical process. Also called technologist.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary - Cite This Source

Main Entry: tech·ni·cian
Pronunciation: tek-'nish-&n
Function: noun
: a specialist in the technical details of a subject or occupation <a medical technician>
Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, © 2002 Merriam-Webster, Inc.
Wallstreet Words - Cite This Source

technician

A person who uses technical analysis to determine the selection and timing of security purchases and sales. Compare fundamentalist. Also called market technician. See also chartist.