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View Full Version : Would you have took it?


thebeardedone
07-17-2009, 07:44 PM
Today, I was offered a job as a C# Junior Developer. The salary was 18,000 a year and I would have been tied in for three years, which meant I would have been unable to do my University degree (Computer Systems Engineering) for that amount of time.

I would have had to travel more than an hour to work each day and it was five days a week.

I told the employer that I was not really a C# programmer, but more of an VB and C one, but that didn't put him off, he was insistent.

I then told him that it wasnt really the right time in my mind (he approached me, College referral me thinks) and that if the positioned arised again in the future then I may answer differently.

I think I did the right thing in refusing it.

However, would you have took the role on?

NYJimbo
07-17-2009, 07:54 PM
"Junior Developer" = maintenance coder

Nothing less satisifying in the programming field than to just do coding updates, other peoples unwanted patches or one-shots or to have to write exactly what someone else wants you to with no creative input of your own.

Ask any programmer who has done it for years, you will hate the job.

14049752
07-17-2009, 07:59 PM
Without knowing your skillsets and position in life, it's hard to answer.

Me personally, I wouldn't have! I don't know C at all...I tried to learn it many years ago, but it wasn't my thing.


I did have a similar situation that I think about every now and again. I was offered a government job, maintaining the local sheriff's office network, pc's and various things. At the time, I was 20, and it would have been $35k salary starting out, plus benefits. I could have done the job, they would have trained me on anything I didn't know, and it would have been a great experience.... Except that it wasn't where I wanted to live and I didn't want to deal with some of the politics involved.
Years later, I don't know if I made the right decision, but I like how things played out for me anyway.

Simmy
07-17-2009, 08:05 PM
Programmers salaries make me cry :( It's amazing anyone is willing to do it.

What do you want to do once you get a degree? Going to uni = ending up in 18k of debt. Taking the job gives you 3 years of valuable experience and less debt/no student loan to pay back. I wish I hadn't gone to uni now as I could have setup on my own straight out of college. My computer science degree wasn't really necessary and I'm sure most of my customers don't even know I've got a degree.

iptech
07-17-2009, 08:27 PM
I think you did the right thing by turning it down, you gave an honest and mature response to his offer and I'm sure he appreciates that. In the midst of a heavy recession junior salaries will have been pushed to their lowest and you'd be tied to low level for the first three years of your career. Stick with the Systems Engineering degree - the economy will be on the up when you've finished and you'll be in a far better position to enter into a far more rewarding career.

Good luck!

TazUk
07-17-2009, 10:12 PM
My computer science degree wasn't really necessary and I'm sure most of my customers don't even know I've got a degree.

There are no academic qualifications that cover what we do and the industry ones aren't really understood by the customers :(

I've got ones for companies that are no longer in business or are irrelevant these days :rolleyes:

thebeardedone
07-17-2009, 10:15 PM
Thanks for the replies and settling my mind.

I was uncertain at first as I really love programming and it seemed like an excellent opportunity, but I really want my degree.

Besides, I don't want to be tied into any roles that I'm potentially going to loathe (certainly not for three years anyway).


What do you want to do once you get a degree? Going to uni = ending up in 18k of debt. Taking the job gives you 3 years of valuable experience and less debt/no student loan to pay back. I wish I hadn't gone to uni now as I could have setup on my own straight out of college. My computer science degree wasn't really necessary and I'm sure most of my customers don't even know I've got a degree.

I just feel that in three years, after completing my degree, I will be three years older and three years wiser to make better decisions.

Thanks again :)

iptech
07-18-2009, 12:10 AM
I just feel that in three years, after completing my degree, I will be three years older and three years wiser to make better decisions.
Absolutely correct fella! As I mentioned earlier, you have a mature attitude that I'm sure will serve you well when balanced with your degree. You haven't given up on programming and you haven't given up on your prospective employer, you've just declined his initial offer. You might want to follow-up to thank him for his offer and explain in writing why you didn't/don't want to accept his offer of a job at this stage, he will appreciate that. I would suggest an old-fashioned letter as it's something both you and he can keep on file and tangibly demonstrates that you gave his offer careful consideration. You might also suggest (or hint at) that you would be prepared to do some programming work for him remotely that would fit in with your studies without involving expensive commuting. Getting paid, even a nominal amount, for doing something you enjoy whilst gaining valuable commercial experience which will mutually work for you both.

If you play it right, you won't have given up on an employment opportunity, you will have created a far better one for the future.

thebeardedone
07-18-2009, 12:49 AM
You might also suggest (or hint at) that you would be prepared to do some programming work for him remotely that would fit in with your studies without involving expensive commuting. Getting paid, even a nominal amount, for doing something you enjoy whilst gaining valuable commercial experience which will mutually work for you both.

Now, that is something that would really interest me. Heck, I wouldn't even be fussed about money as I'm certain that the experience alone is worth its weight in gold.

rusty.nells
07-18-2009, 01:09 AM
Chances are that all of your code, while employed, would belong to the company, even code you created on a personal or unrelated project. You'd probably be better off freelancing.

anonymous Mac Tech
07-18-2009, 04:10 AM
What do you want to do once you get a degree? Going to uni = ending up in 18k of debt. Taking the job gives you 3 years of valuable experience and less debt/no student loan to pay back. I wish I hadn't gone to uni now as I could have setup on my own straight out of college. My computer science degree wasn't really necessary and I'm sure most of my customers don't even know I've got a degree.

Wow! I personally am happy about finishing college and can every day draw on what I learned from it. I went to college late in life and worked for some years with only a high school education and now I worked some years with a college education and I can say it was one of the mot rewarding things I did. It could easily be said that I could be doing what I'm doing without my degrees, but it makes me feel good about what I did and personally I believe it has made me a better tech than I would have been without the education.

As far as not being able to finish your degree if you take this job I really don't comprehend? I worked full time the whole time I went to college. Yeah it took me nearly ten years to complete my bachelors, but I wouldn't have done it differently. Not to mention if you do take the job and stay in school you'll have the degree + experience to have on your resume.;)

iptech
07-18-2009, 06:28 AM
Chances are that all of your code, while employed, would belong to the company, even code you created on a personal or unrelated project. You'd probably be better off freelancing.Freelancing is great if you have years of experience, but as a novice it's well worth learning the benefits and pitfalls of working within an established team. You'll also get to appreciate the commercial pressures that can determine why software products are pushed to market as and how they are. The other problem with freelancing, especially in a discipline such as programming is that you'll only be employed for the skills you currently have, you wont have the benefit of an employer pushing your boundaries and opening you up to newer programming language developments unless you are prepared to invest a lot of your own time and money into continuous learning.