PDA

View Full Version : Marketing Idea


ComputerClinic
07-12-2009, 08:24 PM
So I've very recently launched my business and I've been reading a lot about guerrilla marketing. I have a very tight budget and can't afford to spend thousands on advertising just yet. Anyways, the main idea I'm getting from my studies is that you have to build relationships and establish trust before you start selling your solutions. And basically do anything to stand out and make an impression on your prospects.

So I came up with the idea of including a cd containing useful information or tools with each piece of mail i send out, or each house i visit (yes, I'm going door to door). Possibly an audio CD with useful computer maintenance tips recorded by myself. Or maybe some free tools (Ccleaner, Avira, Malwarebytes, Defraggler, SUMo, etc...) and video tutorials showing clients how to get the most out of this software.

So what do you guys think? Is this a good idea or bad? Is there legal issues with reproducing this freeware and giving it away? How do you think YOUR clients would respond if you were to send them a postcard that included a CD with free tools and useful information?

bagellad
07-12-2009, 08:29 PM
Seems like you would be doing a lot of work to help them not have to call you. Its sort of a creative idea but I don't think it would get you more customers.

ComputerClinic
07-12-2009, 08:49 PM
Seems like you would be doing a lot of work to help them not have to call you. Its sort of a creative idea but I don't think it would get you more customers.
Perhaps you are right. But what if i didn't overload them with free information? Maybe just enough information to spark their interest and establish myself as an "expert"?

For example: I could include a copy of Defraggler. I would audibly explain what file fragmentation is, and how defragmenting can improve performance. A video tutorial for installing and scheduling Defraggler would be included. And at the end I could offer a computer tune up for XX amount of dollars, or at the very least a phone number where they can receive more information about computer maintenance.

studiot
07-12-2009, 09:01 PM
Can't remember where you hail from, but I've seen the 'classes' approach generate business for several individuals over the years in the UK.

Basically you propose a computer or Video editing or Digital Camera or whatever course to the Adult Education Service, with yourself as tutor. They advertise it in their programme.

If you can get enough (usually around 12) participants and are prepared to spend a couple of hours per week for a term or semester the AES run the course and you get a small fee.

Normally these courses are oversubscribed.

I remember one tutor handing out such a CD as you describe, plus of course his business card.

NYJimbo
07-12-2009, 09:13 PM
Seems like you would be doing a lot of work to help them not have to call you. Its sort of a creative idea but I don't think it would get you more customers.

+1

Never give it away if it can make you money. I mean who gives YOU anything for free.

Tesla
07-13-2009, 11:42 AM
Would the average customer even want to know what file fragmentation is?

I guess not. They just want the computer to work.

You don't take your car to the garage, the mechanic shows you how to change brake pads and says to go ahead and do the rest.

Likewise, you don't take the car in and expect the mechanic to replace the clutch and explain how it works and why?

People don't generally wan't to know or can understand.

ComputerClinic
07-13-2009, 08:04 PM
Hmm... I guess that people interested enough to learn computer maintenance aren't my best prospects anyways huh? Still, I would like to include something in my mail that's has a personal touch to it.

Maybe about an audio CD discussing all the things that can go wrong with a computer (slow down, viruses/spyware, data loss), and at the end I would tell them how my company has the solution to these problems.

This way I don't bore them with technical jargon but hopefully induce some fear of things going wrong. Basically, I'm wondering if you guys think an audio CD is a good idea at all? I could just as easily do this in print. But an audio CD gives them a personal introduction to the owner of the company. I don't know its just a thought...

Kenhelms
07-13-2009, 08:06 PM
I give a little cd with freeware on it, a couple of card games, free anti virus protection, Malwarebytes, recurva and firefox.

It really cant hurt your business....

I find that when Mbam picks something up, they usually call anyway.

I use lightscribe to etch the disk with my logo and such. they love it.

yes some might not call you...but there is a difference between a target client and a client.

iptech
07-13-2009, 08:26 PM
+1

Never give it away if it can make you money. I mean who gives YOU anything for free.
I agree, give something for free and they'll expect everything for free. Don't encourage the cheapskates.

ComputerClinic
07-14-2009, 04:19 AM
Can't remember where you hail from, but I've seen the 'classes' approach generate business for several individuals over the years in the UK.

Basically you propose a computer or Video editing or Digital Camera or whatever course to the Adult Education Service, with yourself as tutor. They advertise it in their programme.

If you can get enough (usually around 12) participants and are prepared to spend a couple of hours per week for a term or semester the AES run the course and you get a small fee.

Normally these courses are oversubscribed.

I remember one tutor handing out such a CD as you describe, plus of course his business card.

That's a good idea. I'll look into education services in my area and see if I can start a class on basic computer maintenance.

Well I understand that its not a good idea to teach people how fix computers for free. But I still think I'm going to burn some audio CDs explaining all the things that can break a computer. I'll include some free software as well (no tutorials. If they need help, they can call me.) :)

I'll report back in a few months with the results of my efforts.