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View Full Version : Not towards the forum but towards bryce. And an article


hondablaster
06-17-2009, 11:20 PM
I would like to see an article dedicated to getting a JOB! What do you guys look for when hiring techs. Does a kid just walk into your shop and ask for an applicatoin. When you were fresh to the industry what did you look for in a company. What tools did you use to land a job. How did you dress toward at the interview. What questions were you asked etc etc. What surprises did you find when you jumped in. Is it a matter of who you know, instead of what you know?

Start off with, alot of people aspire to become technicians in various fields of IT. But what are employers really looking for......

In construction the Union Gave us an orientation describing what to do to land a gig. "One of the many tips was show up at the time the job starts even if its 5am!!! Dress like your ready to work. Dusty work boots, tool belt, and HARD HAT is a must!!!! They may put you to work that day!!! Wear your tool belt over your shoulder showing off your set of tools, Have it neat and organized but not so clean as if you bought the tools the night before. Dont make chit chat march up state your reason for being there. Chit chat is annoying to a foreman who has seen 1000 carpenters come and go in that year alone. They dont want to know you, they just want to know you can work and shut up and do the job. Be strong, rugged, and confident and go strait to the foreman and let him know your apprentice level or journey man experience and what your niche usually is. Make sure he knows you can work that day, They hate flakes or work site shoppers. Showing up in casual attire at 9am looks lazy, saying yeah I can start next week seems as if your fishing for better locations, or easier work, if you show up without a hardhat nobody will even look in your direction. "

Can we please see something like that written in your usual style. I have been to 3 jobs interviews for Desktop Support and they all say I need customer service experience. And one said I need A+ and MCP :(
I would simply like to work part time at a shop now. I need a Job :(

thebeardedone
06-17-2009, 11:30 PM
Good idea :)

It's pretty hard for starting techs, so more information aimed at those for getting jobs could be a good feature ...

ITG Tech
06-18-2009, 02:00 AM
I just had an interview with the North West Florida Economic Development Group. Some questions were very similar to what Hondablaster just asked. My response was that too many people show up to work without any work ethics or job skills. I am not talking about technical ability, or knowledge gained in a classroom or other educational sources. Many young and not so young people do not have the basic people skills, and work ethics necessary to deal with clients and customers. They are not customer service oriented and have little idea of what it means to take responsibility for what they do or say. In my company when I hire someone they must know how to work, and how to communicate. I can teach them the technical aspects of the job, but if they lack the basic work skills and have no respect for the employers, clients, or themselves, they donít last very long. If I have to go and re-due everything that they were tasks to do, what is the point of hiring them? Having all the educations that dadís money can buy, and knowing how to make a PC sing is only one aspect of an employee. When you are paying someone to do a task that should take 1 hour at the most and then 5 ours later they are just getting around to starting the job, what would you do? Working on your own computers and helping out your family and friends is great, but in a business, it often includes production as well as quality. A service oriented business should strive to present a professional appearance to the public. Employees should not look like you just picked them up at the bus station with their cardboard signs. Sorry, but this is a sore subject for me. I guess I expect my employees to work and earn their paycheck. I am really not in a position to spread the wealth because someoneís parents did not teach their child how to work.
Now you know what one computer shop owner looks for in a potential employee.
:)

anonymous Mac Tech
06-18-2009, 03:10 AM
Many young and not so young people do not have the basic people skills, and work ethics necessary to deal with clients and customers. They are not customer service oriented and have little idea of what it means to take responsibility for what they do or say. In my company when I hire someone they must know how to work, and how to communicate. I can teach them the technical aspects of the job, but if they lack the basic work skills and have no respect for the employers, clients, or themselves, they donít last very long.
:)


Good points there. Let them know you are attending school and majoring in IT so they know you are ambitious. Even if you haven't finished school make sure its on your resume. That will at least possibly get you an interview. If you have no previous work experience you may need to take a job doing something retail/customer service related to work on people skills while you are in school. I had already had a lot of previous work experience before I landed my 1st tech support job. They couldn't have cared less that I had no professional technical experience. They wanted to know I had technical aptitude (i.e. ability to learn technical things) which by than I already had at least 1 associate degree, but experience wise they wanted to know that I had customer service experience.

MHCG
06-18-2009, 03:29 AM
So many techs I've met have real personality issues, almost autistic in nature. It's almost as if the IT industry attracts dysfunctional people. All are necessary, but as an IT manager and supervisor, my priorties in order from most to least important are:

People Skills
Curiosity (the desire to learn how things really work)
Self Motivation (don't wait for someone to tell you what needs to be done)
Creativity (thinking outside of the box and coming up with that solution that others don't think of)
Technical Expertise

hondablaster
06-18-2009, 07:14 AM
So many techs I've met have real personality issues, almost autistic in nature. It's almost as if the IT industry attracts dysfunctional people. All are necessary, but as an IT manager and supervisor, my priorties in order from most to least important are:

People Skills
Curiosity (the desire to learn how things really work)
Self Motivation (don't wait for someone to tell you what needs to be done)
Creativity (thinking outside of the box and coming up with that solution that others don't think of)
Technical Expertise

If I lived in Arizona I would walk into your shop. :)

The IT industry DOES attract some strange characters, let me tell you I used to want to have friends into "tech stuff" but I gave up on that when I realized there sometimes was a reason they like gadgets and gizmos. Because those were their friends, LOL

But anyways, when I couldn't work construction anymore I got a job at a Restaurant when the staffing agency roberthalf told me that he would hire me but needs to know that I have customer service skills (they were going to put me in a 1000 desktop environment doing small tasks) He told me he couldnt because I have no "people" experiance he told me to get a job at a Restaurant and try to get an A+ or MCP. He also hinted it didnt matter what I knew. It was those Certs is what they were looking for. Kinda made me really bitter and Sad. But I sucked it up and got a job at a Restaurant after the 3rd sad interview. Now im unemployed and back in California with 1 year of being a waiter at a nice restaurant under my belt so that cant be an excuse no more. On a side note. Construction does not look good on a resume LET ME TELL YOU.

Hondablaster.

MHCG
06-18-2009, 08:16 AM
If I lived in Arizona I would walk into your shop. :)

The IT industry DOES attract some strange characters, let me tell you I used to want to have friends into "tech stuff" but I gave up on that when I realized there sometimes was a reason they like gadgets and gizmos. Because those were their friends, LOL

In my experience, the best workers in break fix and desktop support are the ones that really don't care to discuss or spend time thinking about computers outside of work. Of course there are always the crazy geniuses that can lay their hands on computers and the computers seem to fix themselves, but those guys are really the ones I'd want working in my server room or designing architecture away from normal people. ;)

But anyways, when I couldn't work construction anymore I got a job at a Restaurant when the staffing agency roberthalf told me that he would hire me but needs to know that I have customer service skills (they were going to put me in a 1000 desktop environment doing small tasks) He told me he couldnt because I have no "people" experiance he told me to get a job at a Restaurant and try to get an A+ or MCP. He also hinted it didnt matter what I knew. It was those Certs is what they were looking for. Kinda made me really bitter and Sad. But I sucked it up and got a job at a Restaurant after the 3rd sad interview. Now im unemployed and back in California with 1 year of being a waiter at a nice restaurant under my belt so that cant be an excuse no more. On a side note. Construction does not look good on a resume LET ME TELL YOU.

Hondablaster.

I really can't understand why anyone would recommend you get a job at a restaurant to prove you have people skills. :confused: That's what interviews are for. I KNOW if someone has people skills by the end of the interview. Hopefully you are keeping your tech skills sharp.

WRT the original topic, if I were to advise a potential employee on how to get hired, I'd say be charismatic. Unfortunately, that's not something you can read or learn about, it's a social skill that you either have or don't. If you're not charismatic then as an alternative, work on your confidence. Do practice interviews, believe that you know your **** because when you believe it, your attitude reflects it. Don't be bitter, don't talk bad about your current/past employers or bad experiences. Negativity in interviews does NOT go over well because frankly if I find out that you didn't get along with a past supervisor, I'm going to assume you were at fault.

It's always helpful to have a good story about some obstacle that you overcame in your tech career through hard work/ingenuity or some other skill the employer is looking for.

breadtrk
06-18-2009, 02:08 PM
Don't take Certs to an interview, take documented results, best advise ever given to me.

0gr3
06-18-2009, 03:13 PM
This is somewhat in the same vein so I thought rather than make a new topic ask in here. I'm in the situation where I want to get a desktop support job and get off of the phones but all of the places around here want at least an A+ cert or more. Now my questions is, is it better to self study for A+ and other certs or go to school? I am self studying the A+ right now which I think is good because it will show motivation and initiative on the other hand you get more experience in school since you are surrounded by the stuff and get hands on knowledge. Which is more valuable for cost = job acquirability and make a person look more appealing on a resume?

breadtrk
06-18-2009, 04:55 PM
No one will ever ask HOW you got the A+, and to tell the truth they don't care. It is a double edge sword anyway; self study and hands on, you didn't learn enough or the right stuff; classes and all you have is book knowledge.

At this stage I would skip A+ and go straight to MCDST.

Bryce W
06-18-2009, 05:37 PM
Ive been self employed since my typical teenager "video store" job. So I have never been through the "how to get hired at a tech business" system so I am not really qualified to answer this question. The others have already done a great job though.

I do hire some people for web development on some of my projects and I can tell you how I hire with that.

The most important thing to me is..... work ethic.
There are so many people who are amazing at code/designing/whatever but just about ALL of them are flakey. Now I am at the point where I consider work ethic above their skills.

14049752
06-19-2009, 12:51 AM
I realize this isn't exactly what you were asking for, but it's close.

Years ago, when I applied at a company to be their bench tech, I went through the interview process, took their knowledge tests, talked to the current lead-tech, then to the manager who would be my boss.

I thought my interview was ok...I thought I answered everything well enough, and I got the job. A month or less later, after my boss was happy with my results, he called me into his office.

He told me "I just wanted to tell you that you're doing a great job, but I wanted to let you know something to help you improve. When I interviewed you, you were far away the most knowledgable person appyling...you're the only one currently here that aced the tests...but I almost didn't hire you because you had no people skills and I thought you were too quiet and unsure of yourself."

I know that he was happy with my work, my ethic, and (ironically enough) my work related people skills because within a matter of months I was the highest paid tech there, and within a year I became the company go-to tech for television repairs and approving new tools and software..... but my boss only took me out to lunch once.... He said that realized that my people skills are only "on" when I'm clocked in.... :D

hondablaster
06-19-2009, 01:48 AM
Thanks for the replies.

I almost got the desktop support job. BTW RobertHalfTechnology is a temp agency for all fields of IT. The guy left and came back and said that his client needs to know I can handle the problems of lots of different people. He said I may have enough knowledge in that field but he needs to know that I have the character and charisma needed needed to fix the problems of many different people. He said the client insist that whoever they hire has at least 1 year in a customer service role. I think he said it was an insurance call center or something. He did not give the name of the company only that it was big and they needed someone to fix minor things. Peripherals etc.

I think because I was in construction and factories first he assumed I was probably not the most sociable guy. Or some hillbilly. At the interview I was nervous, because doing blue collar labor and going to something that had to do with a computers was intimidating and I wanted to do it so BAD! I was also nervous I was going to be stereotyped as a typical beer drinking, smoking, cursing redneck. LOL which i'm not. I'm a tech dork who was born to a long line of blue collar types. And naturally I was following that path. Im glad of this recession in some ways because it forces me to do something, and break the cycle. I dont want to be a labor monkey the rest of my life. Construction has it "knowledgeable moments" but its limited to doing the same thing over and over again with people who have 0 ambition most of the time. Technology is always new and fun and I "get it" not to mention you live longer.

I'm just so scared to dress up and start hitting up PC repair shops in my area. I keep on thinking they want a guy who has a bachelors in IT or something. Or someone who can write software, webpages. I never see them advertising for help. Where do you guys list your needs for help? Should I just walk in and ask for an application? I think you guys don't realize. I'm completely ignorant when I comes to how IT works as a job. Its intimidating.

Hondablaster

MikeBusby
07-06-2009, 06:44 AM
I instilled in my kids the need to have worked some pretty menial jobs to instil in them the requirements that they needed to work with the general public. All 5 of them have worked variously as kitchen hands and counter staff at a variety of fast food joints/movie theatres/cafes/bars as well as in supermarkets. They are now all in mid level management positions with their feet firmly on the rungs of career progression because they know what it is like to service a customer and how hard it can be to deliever what they want. It may seem like a backward step to start slinging hash or burgers but if you can stick it out for a couple of months it will show an employer your ability to inertract with clients.

This will be of greater benefit to you than any formal qualification.

Volunteering also shows that you have a commitment to something, it really doesn't matter all that much what you volunteer for so long as you are willing to put your hand up to help others.

Make it clear at the interview that you enjoy meeting new people, that you can handle a challange and look for oppertunities to advance yourself and that you aren't afraid of doing the hard yards to get ahead.

A positive attitude and the ability to inetract with people will go a long way towards getting a job.