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View Full Version : My trick to revive that critical component.


frostbyte5014
04-12-2009, 11:30 PM
Thought I would share one of my tricks of the trade. I learned this years ago from an electronics tech. If you have a component like a mobo, video card, ect that just has to work because you don't have a replacement part on hand try freezing it. Many electronics die from heat damage. Freezing sometimes cause the tiny connections to contract back into place.

purple_minion
04-13-2009, 03:58 AM
Thought I would share one of my tricks of the trade. I learned this years ago from an electronics tech. If you have a component like a mobo, video card, ect that just has to work because you don't have a replacement part on hand try freezing it. Many electronics die from heat damage. Freezing sometimes cause the tiny connections to contract back into place.

And once all the condensation hits it when you bring it back out of the freezer? Or say it doesn't short from moisture, what happens when it warms up in 10 minutes and stops working?

AtYourService
04-13-2009, 05:23 AM
always used to use this for the 'click of death' on hard drives, freezing it would give it enough life to copy critical data off of it before putingit out of its misery

frostbyte5014
04-13-2009, 07:05 AM
And once all the condensation hits it when you bring it back out of the freezer? Or say it doesn't short from moisture, what happens when it warms up in 10 minutes and stops working?

If you let it thaw at normal room temperature it won't condensate. Don't knock it till try it. It's not something you really want to do but, will save your ass when you need it. Oh and like AtYourService said it works great for hard drives with bad controllers.

nudone
04-13-2009, 09:41 AM
sounds like a pretty handy tip, frostbyte.

would you mind saying what components you've had work with this method? it might help indicate which components are likely heat death failures, i.e. maybe motherboards are most common.

thanks.

Methical
04-13-2009, 11:23 AM
Sounds like a good tip as a LAST resort.
I'm a bit wary bout when it heats back up, but I guess if you leave it @ room temperature and not plug it straight back into the PC it may come right :)

How long are you freezing it for Frosty?
And are you just using an everyday house freezer?

Joe The PC Doc
04-13-2009, 01:28 PM
I have used this a couple times with mixed results, in one case it seemed to let me read a bad HD for about 10 minutes after every freeze.

But as far as condensation, put the device in an air tight freezer baggie first, should reduce the moisture getting to it.

frostbyte5014
04-13-2009, 11:56 PM
I have used this for Hard Drives, Mobo's and high end FX video cards. It's not usually a permanent fix but just a temp till you get the replacement part. One trick with the hard drive is to keep it on ice while trying to recover data. Put the drive in a couple zip lock bags and put it in a small bucket of ice with a long 36" ribbon or sata cable. I have used this method to recove a lot of data. The majority of drive issues stem from the controller board on the drive going bad.

thor999
04-18-2009, 10:34 AM
I would imagine the solder is reflowing on the IC's, and that freezing it contracts the PCB enough to reform those points.

Fixedathome.com
04-18-2009, 07:01 PM
I've used this on hard drives before with success. Definitely worth a pop as a last resort.