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View Full Version : I have a confession...


ID10t
04-07-2009, 03:36 PM
I am making a living posing as a computer professional. I am good at what I do but I really think I am more like the neighbor who "knows computers". I have a few certs (A+ and the like) but we all know that those don't mean a whole lot.

Here is the predicament. I want to learn more but I have too much business to go back to fulltime or even parttime working for somebody else. What should I do?

TimeCode
04-07-2009, 03:57 PM
Have you thought about taking classes at the local community college or university?

afisher
04-07-2009, 04:03 PM
what area of computing/tech would you like to learn more in? more in general? or a specific area i.e. linux/servers/networking/security etc...

DanF
04-07-2009, 05:29 PM
We're on the same boat. I've done some Cisco courses, which are equivalent to the A+ and A+ Network. They aren't the best you can get. Some suggested me to try some Microsoft courses. You end up learning more from experience... but it's never to late to keep studying if you have the time :)

ID10t
04-07-2009, 05:50 PM
I'd like to become at repairing PCs. Networking and servers would be nive too but I really don't know where to begin. Repairing PCs should probably take top priority. I guess my biggest need would be truly learning how to troubleshoot problems.

I'm glad to see that I'm not alone. I want to be the best but I don't have the time to drop everything and start from scratch.

14049752
04-07-2009, 11:46 PM
I am making a living posing as a computer professional. I am good at what I do but I really think I am more like the neighbor who "knows computers"

I have to give you tons of credit for being able to step back and realize this...lots of people that should don't.

Anyway, I don't think that there's any better teacher than experience. As for the stuff you're already doing, just read up on stuff, make sure you're keeping up with the latest virus/spyware removal techniques. Make sure you're doing proper hardware diagnostics (running the correct tools, etc).
I don't really think diagnostic skills can be taught in a class...you really just need to learn by doing.

frostbyte5014
04-08-2009, 12:00 AM
I agree with you 14049752 (http://www.technibble.com/forums/member.php?u=5856). I strongly believe experience is the substance that makes a good tech. It's hard to say what the best route would be at this point. I would suggest that you find someone that would be willing to take you under their wing for a while. I would approach some of the professors at you local technical college and be up front with them and see if they can help you out. Short of that all I can say is two words, Technibble, and Google. Good luck! We'll help any way we can.

ID10t
04-08-2009, 01:23 AM
I have to give you tons of credit for being able to step back and realize this...lots of people that should don't.

Anyway, I don't think that there's any better teacher than experience. As for the stuff you're already doing, just read up on stuff, make sure you're keeping up with the latest virus/spyware removal techniques. Make sure you're doing proper hardware diagnostics (running the correct tools, etc).
I don't really think diagnostic skills can be taught in a class...you really just need to learn by doing.

Thanks. I have to be honest with myself if I am going to be honest with my clients. I have some good ones and I want to keep them, which means that I need to be better at what I do.

So what do you recommend I do to start doing the correct hardware diagnostics?

ID10t
04-08-2009, 01:24 AM
Short of that all I can say is two words, Technibble, and Google. Good luck! We'll help any way we can.

Thank you!

Methical
04-08-2009, 03:49 AM
So what do you recommend I do to start doing the correct hardware diagnostics?

Spend a day reading over the Hardware category on the forum
Spend a second day reading over it again

And make sure you have every tool from "Repair Tool of the Week" in your toolkit, and get familiar with each and every one. Know how, when and why to use each one.

I'm in the same boat as you. I'm still studying at the moment. Working on my third diploma and should be finished in a few weeks. Few hundred hours work experience is part of our course, once exams are completed, which is good. And yeah, I've become to be known as "Tim the Computer Guy" over the last 5-6 years. I don't charge much, because my friends & family aren't exactly well off, but knowledge and experience is more important to me at the moment. I just take a small fee to help out with my bills at home.

ID10t
04-08-2009, 06:48 AM
Spend a day reading over the Hardware category on the forum
Spend a second day reading over it again

And make sure you have every tool from "Repair Tool of the Week" in your toolkit, and get familiar with each and every one. Know how, when and why to use each one.

I just went through all the tools and downloaded the ones that I didn't already have. There are a lot of tools out there that I didn't know existed. This is cool!

I plan on going over the hardware category in the next few days when I have time.

Thanks for the advice.

Tiddle
04-08-2009, 11:40 AM
This sites great. I know its helped me more than a handful of times.
Good Luck and Keep At It.

Rider
04-08-2009, 03:44 PM
I want to learn more but I have too much business to go back to fulltime or even parttime working for somebody else. What should I do?

It sounds like you are doing something right. It has been my experience in all aspects of life that those that are willing to admit to there shortcomings are probably not coming up as short as they think. The folks that believe they are the greatest are usually the ones coming up short, very short.

My advice would be to press on as is, it's working for you. At the same time take every opportunity you can get to learn. It sounds like you have a good client base, you don't get that by being incompetent. I have to assume you are good at what you do, you know your limitations and don't allow yourself to get in over your head. You are doing it right. Everyday your limitations will get fewer and fewer.

The fact that you know you're not perfect and can improve puts you way ahead of most of the competition.