PDA

View Full Version : Billing for Tech Support Phone Calls?


paidsupport
04-06-2009, 08:42 PM
I know in this day an age existing customers, and new ones are always trying to call up by phone and get free tech support calls. In an effort to be helpful and nice, people have a tendency not to cut them off. Many times they'll waste time asking questions and take up your valuable time which you could be getting paid for! :(

I'm curious to know your thoughts on how you personally handle this issue?

And how are you getting those people to commit to paying for your service instead of just asking questions for free?

Michael

rtrahan
04-06-2009, 09:24 PM
Excellent response...that just about covers it all..

frostbyte5014
04-06-2009, 09:32 PM
Agreed. That is all that needs to be said.

Menaice
04-06-2009, 09:41 PM
end user errors = job security :cool:

dhrandy
04-07-2009, 12:49 AM
I actually haven't had many of these calls. It seems most people around here call when they have problems and most want the problem fixed.

The few that I have had like that, I also tell them I would have to diagnose the problem further to get to the main cause of the problem. Most computer problems can be cause by a multitude of things.

cmonova
04-07-2009, 02:58 PM
We very seldom have that problem. Typically when someone calls we will listen to the problem they are having and tell them we can come on-site or connect remotely and take care of it.

If they start to ask questions about how to do things we just tell them unfortunetely we can not help without looking at the pc due to it could be numerous things and we would not want to guide them in the wrong direction.

ID10t
04-07-2009, 03:15 PM
We very seldom have that problem. Typically when someone calls we will listen to the problem they are having and tell them we can come on-site or connect remotely and take care of it.

If they start to ask questions about how to do things we just tell them unfortunetely we can not help without looking at the pc due to it could be numerous things and we would not want to guide them in the wrong direction.

That is a pretty good response. I usually answer 1 or 2 quick questions about how to perform quick functions or things like that but to properly diagnose I have to see the problem.

PCERTtimh
06-15-2009, 02:34 PM
I would have to agree with what both ACG & cmonova, that said many times this leads into actual support as many people feel more secure in having someone tell them the truth. As we all know there can be those times where any problem can be misdiagnosed for a number of reasons:

Here are my top 3:

1) Client gives you the wrong info (they didn't write down the exact error message or code and are just trying to remember something close to it)

2) Does not tell you exactly what happened until you question them a bit further. (Usually after reading the logs)

3) We tend to work from the foundation up, so unless you can see the system first hand there really could be a number of issues aside from just the one they are calling you for

TimeCode
08-13-2009, 11:16 PM
Yes, I understand that this is an old thread, but I have a new answer for it.

I direct them to my website and while they're there, I tell them that I am going to log on to their PC so I can see exactly what the problem is. And just before they are in, I tell them that it is $15 for 15 minutes. They either agree or hang up. In any case, I win.

Saying it is $15 for 15 minutes sounds a whole lot better to them than saying it is $60 per hour. ;)

Blues
08-14-2009, 02:36 PM
Yes, I understand that this is an old thread, but I have a new answer for it.

I direct them to my website and while they're there, I tell them that I am going to log on to their PC so I can see exactly what the problem is. And just before they are in, I tell them that it is $15 for 15 minutes. They either agree or hang up. In any case, I win.

Saying it is $15 for 15 minutes sounds a whole lot better to them than saying it is $60 per hour. ;)

I think wording it $15 for every quater hour might sound better as people then have a harder time seeing the 1:1 dollar to minute ratio.