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View Full Version : Macrum Reflect Free edition


paulw
03-30-2009, 06:07 AM
http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.asp

Absolutely free! No strings! The only free XP and Vista compatible disk imaging software with BartPE and Linux based recovery options.


Create a disk image whilst running Windows using Microsoft Volume Shadow copy Service (VSS).
Image to Network, USB, FireWire drives and DVD.
Built in scheduler.
32 bit and native 64 bit versions.
Industry leading compression levels and speed.
Linux based Rescue CD with Network access and full GUI. Only 6.5MB in size!
Built in CD/DVD packet writing engine. Supports packet writing to DVD DL media with Windows Vista.
HTML log files
.

I was in a bit of a tight spot the other day as I was out at a client for work and had left my CD folder of tricks back at the office and went looking for a quick and easy drive cloner. Macrum worked perfectly. I was able to image the OS to an external USB drive from inside the OS. It really saved my butt that day!

abe
03-30-2009, 06:39 AM
sounds cool will check it out

Simmy
03-30-2009, 09:25 AM
Brilliant - this is the perfect alternative to acronis for my home users. I will give it a try tonight :)

nudone
03-30-2009, 05:06 PM
i tested out Macrium Reflect (free edition) a few months ago with the intention of it being something to recommend to customers. i didn't do any recommendations though as it felt like i'd be doing myself out of a bit of business.

in other words, you'd make yourself redundant by showing your customer how to make a successful backup and restore. admittedly, a lot of customers still wouldn't manage to do the operation(s) without guidance.

so, just a quick question: how do you approach educating the customer to do the work themselves whilst not cutting out the business it would have brought in if you didn't show them. or is that the point, you don't show them how, you merely do it for them - the software just happens to be free for domestic users.

14049752
03-30-2009, 06:43 PM
so, just a quick question: how do you approach educating the customer to do the work themselves whilst not cutting out the business it would have brought in if you didn't show them. or is that the point, you don't show them how, you merely do it for them - the software just happens to be free for domestic users.


You should show them how to do it. Period.
Showing a customer how to do something like back-up their computer is one of those things that they should know, and be taught how to do. Most customers won't remember how, and might still have you help them out. Nearly every customer will appreciate that you're teaching them something they can use, prevent problems, and that you're not just trying to make a buck on them on every little thing.

nudone
03-30-2009, 07:08 PM
i think that's a fair point to make, though, i'd then have to ask: would you charge them for showing them?

SOHO-NZ
03-30-2009, 09:37 PM
i think that's a fair point to make, though, i'd then have to ask: would you charge them for showing them?

If you are charging by the hour then this is never an issue.

If you are charging flat rate then your price ought to reflect the time to do the work only - you will never know how long it will take to teach someone how to do something - so that kind of work should be an option with a time based rate.

It all gets kind of messy when you are partly flat rate & partly by the hour. I just bill by the hour - if the customer wants to show me their holidays snaps - that's fine, but they're paying for my time!

joe3k
03-30-2009, 09:44 PM
I think nudone makes a valid point. If a customer knows how to restore an image, they'll simply buy an external hdd and save their important stuff to it. If anything goes wrong, they'll restore the image and still be able to access all their stuff on the external hdd.

Faced with the choice of re-install a few programs etc after the simple image and be back in business in no time, or get a tech out at say 50/hr to fix the issue. Well most home users are cheap and their stuff (programs etc) usually are not mission critical so long as they still have access to their data they'll go the image route.

However teaching customers to "backup" their data - well thats a differecnt story alltogether. Of course you should show them.

nudone
03-31-2009, 09:26 AM
"teaching" sounds like the right way to approach it, i.e. a customer pays for the lesson. or, it sounds like an ideal thing to tell the customer about when they're paying by the hour and you've got time to kill until the full hour is up.

in the past (when norton ghost wasn't owned by norton), i've recommended system backups to people but i've always done it for them - and this has always been for my benefit really, so that i don't have to do a complete reinstall of their machine when they mess it up. i've shown friends how to do it for themselves BUT they still contact me to do it - even the ones that take notes.

i think the length of time it takes to show someone (even longer if they are taking notes and you have to create partitions or burn several dvds) justifies it being a 'service' that is charged for. plus the overall apathy people tend to have about backing things up, well, those that have never lost any data of value.

stevenamills
03-31-2009, 12:50 PM
I don't think it's an issue.

I'm always willing to tell a customer "how". Nearly every time their eyes glaze over at the complexity and they engage me to do it. I get credit for being wiling to help and still get the job.

In the rare case they try and succeed, I invariably get the next job.

paulw
04-01-2009, 01:02 AM
i tested out Macrium Reflect (free edition) a few months ago with the intention of it being something to recommend to customers. i didn't do any recommendations though as it felt like i'd be doing myself out of a bit of business.

in other words, you'd make yourself redundant by showing your customer how to make a successful backup and restore. admittedly, a lot of customers still wouldn't manage to do the operation(s) without guidance.

so, just a quick question: how do you approach educating the customer to do the work themselves whilst not cutting out the business it would have brought in if you didn't show them. or is that the point, you don't show them how, you merely do it for them - the software just happens to be free for domestic users.
I've always found it best to try and educate my customers, they appreciate the honesty and more often than not they're not at ALL technically inclined anyway and say something like "Oh I'll just call you over if I get stuck with that!".

nudone
04-01-2009, 09:31 AM
that appears to be the most common reaction. i've seen many customers/friends eyes glaze over when anything is explained to them - they just want to know if ebay works.

and, to be fair, i do the same if anyone starts talking to me about how a car engine works.

my original question was more a way of asking myself why do i show people how to do things when they have no interest really.

but i agree, best to be willing to demonstrate these things. whether you charge for it or not - it's part of providing a good service one way or another.

paulw
04-01-2009, 11:45 PM
Oh yes, of course charge for your time when you show them! That's part of "training".

Believe me, my eyes glaze over when people talk about car repair or finance stuff so I don't hold a grudge when it happens to me :)