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View Full Version : [Want To Buy] Hot Air Station


Azz
03-18-2009, 06:03 PM
My good old de-soldering iron just isn't doing the job, so I am looking for something more reliable.

Not to bothered about makes etc, its to be used for desoldering DC Jacks.

Thanks,

Aaron

AtYourService
03-19-2009, 12:54 AM
im usually fine with either the radio shack desolderer with the rubber bulb sucker
or my trusty solder iron and adding new melted solder to the dc jack's old solder and using my plastic solder-sucker to get it up

Kermit
07-03-2009, 05:52 PM
Get an air pump bbgun pistol. One pump, heat the joint and blast it. Part usually comes right out. It's fast too. Which really helps with small parts.
Kermit

NYJimbo
07-03-2009, 05:59 PM
Get an air pump bbgun pistol. One pump, heat the joint and blast it. Part usually comes right out. It's fast too. Which really helps with small parts.
Kermit

:confused: Really?. I can't believe this is a serious post.

14049752
07-03-2009, 06:02 PM
Get an air pump bbgun pistol. One pump, heat the joint and blast it. Part usually comes right out. It's fast too. Which really helps with small parts.
Kermit


I want to see a video of this technique! Post a video to youtube. I can't image that it's very safe.

To the OP: Check on ebay or amazon. You can find a decent inexpensive rework station new.

Kermit
07-03-2009, 06:10 PM
Sorry, I don't have that ability just yet. (Utube). I have been doing it for many decades now. Never had any problems.

It is a bit messy in the work spot. And not having any exposed parts around to catch the flying stuff would be helpfull

Kermit

NYJimbo
07-03-2009, 06:47 PM
Sorry, I don't have that ability just yet. (Utube). I have been doing it for many decades now. Never had any problems.

It is a bit messy in the work spot. And not having any exposed parts around to catch the flying stuff would be helpfull

Kermit

I can't even imagine a scenario where this would even be necessary, to say nothing about it being useful over normal techniques. Why the heck would anyone want to blow out the chip/part/jack with high velocity/impact air. Molten led and parts flying all around. The possibility of blowing out another part of the board or chips when you do this ?. This is just insane and unecessary.

usacvlr
07-03-2009, 06:55 PM
Yeah I don't think the airgun idea would be good for smt style printed circuit boards. Old through hole boards or tube type chassis mount connector standoffs sure but otherwise..

Just use a soldapullt yes that's spelled right.
The chinese knockoffs are iffy. Either will wear out in about 6 months but they're relatively cheap. Other than that you just need a good temperature controlled weller station. Helps if you grew up with a soldering iron in your hand too and have the scars to show it!

Luis
07-04-2009, 08:20 PM
Get an air pump bbgun pistol. One pump, heat the joint and blast it. Part usually comes right out. It's fast too. Which really helps with small parts.
Kermit

Would you blast the part with air or with an actually pellet?

I thought pump BB guns were spring loaded?

If it really works I gotta go find my Official Red Ryder Carbine-Action Two-Hundred-Shot Range Model Air Rifle. Just joshin with ya :p

Kermit
07-05-2009, 07:14 AM
Yeah I don't think the airgun idea would be good for smt style printed circuit boards. Old through hole boards or tube type chassis mount connector standoffs sure but otherwise..

Just use a soldapullt yes that's spelled right.
The chinese knockoffs are iffy. Either will wear out in about 6 months but they're relatively cheap. Other than that you just need a good temperature controlled weller station. Helps if you grew up with a soldering iron in your hand too and have the scars to show it!

Actually, that's what it works best on. Okay, maybe 2 pumps on the through hole boards.

Kermit

Kermit
07-05-2009, 07:23 AM
Would you blast the part with air or with an actually pellet?

I thought pump BB guns were spring loaded?

If it really works I gotta go find my Official Red Ryder Carbine-Action Two-Hundred-Shot Range Model Air Rifle. Just joshin with ya :p

Air pump gun, not rifle, Use Air only, then if that don't work, insert pellet!

:-)

What makes it work so well is that you can get hundreds of lbs of pressure in a tiny pop. kinda like shooting a compressed ball of air that keeps expanding. It gets into the tiny holes forcing out everything.

Sometimes the part comes right off with it.

Kermit

Digital Regenesis
12-23-2009, 07:18 AM
Air pump gun, not rifle, Use Air only..Kermit

I'm afraid to ask what you use to clean cases instead of compressed air? :D

Psychoticus
12-23-2009, 07:22 AM
Get an air pump bbgun pistol. One pump, heat the joint and blast it. Part usually comes right out. It's fast too. Which really helps with small parts.
Kermit

That's Awesome lol You have to set up a youtube account film and post, i'll even set up the account if need be, being a tech i'm sure your phone or someone you know has a phone or even better a video recorder on it to film this lol.

Johnthegeek
02-26-2010, 07:30 PM
do you preheat with some gasoline(petrol) and a match?

MobileTechie
02-27-2010, 10:24 AM
I recently bought a cheap Aoyue hot air station and it is brilliant for desoldering jacks. I would highly recommend it. You still use a solder sucker but unlike with a soldering iron, all the solder sucks up and the jack drops off leaving clean shiny pads.

georgenoise
03-01-2010, 05:33 PM
How come nobody ever mentions soldering wick? I've used this since back in the day when i was a pager technician replacing the crystals that control the frequency. I use it for DC jacks all the time, the hot air would be useful for things like IC chips and things of that nature. I must admit though hot air is pretty cool to use, if you worried about dropping extra parts or damaging the board from excessive heat they do make products to shield the area you are soldering/desoldering to keep the heat from spreading over where it isn't wanted.

4ycr
06-09-2011, 11:27 AM
reported above as spam

phaZed
06-09-2011, 10:45 PM
above, your full of it... Miss Sally 2 post. Reported as well.


Aoyue 968 Hot Air rework station $189 shipped from Amazon (USA).
http://www.amazon.com/Aoyue-968-Digital-Rework-Station/dp/B000HDG0AO

I just picked one of these up and have been thoroughly impressed.

Haktar
06-11-2011, 09:59 AM
We have two Ayoue's here and a Kada, a few months ago i would have swore by Aoyue i love them! but get a Kada if you can, its much better

phaZed
06-12-2011, 03:58 AM
How come nobody ever mentions soldering wick? I've used this since back in the day when i was a pager technician replacing the crystals that control the frequency. I use it for DC jacks all the time, the hot air would be useful for things like IC chips and things of that nature. I must admit though hot air is pretty cool to use, if you worried about dropping extra parts or damaging the board from excessive heat they do make products to shield the area you are soldering/desoldering to keep the heat from spreading over where it isn't wanted.

I use soldering wick as well, and in conjunction with the hot air station. Soldering wick is funny stuff, and if you don't have premium stuff it doesn't work too well. Soldering wick usually has some type of coating such as rosin to help suck up the solder. Solder wick goes bad after time (especially the cheap stuff) from oxidation on the copper braid, this is why it comes in those little "spool" things, so you don't go touching it. I like solder wick, but when working of power jacks for instance it never seems to get the solder out of the hole and off of the pins completely. Ya some comes off, but not all, and the darn jack is still stuck in there. What i do is heat up the jack and pull it out. much of the solder comes out on the old jack. Then I fill the holes up with new solder (the ones that need it) and suck it out with a solder sucker or braid. I prefer the braid, but the sucker has it's places too.

The bad thing about some of these jacks is that they use a high tin content and it takes a BUNCH of heat to get it to melt. They use this most often on the mounting pins so that the jack has less of a chance to break off the motherboard. It is also used quite often on the middle pin on jack designs that don't offer much built in support for the pin. More often than not I find myself having difficulty getting the high tin content solder to melt and suck into a braid, in which case I put a small nozzle on the hot air tip, heat it up, and blow it out the other side... works a treat.