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View Full Version : Critique my Postcard


rvdsabu4life
01-05-2009, 03:44 PM
We are sending the attached postcard to about 1000 businesses around the area. I did this solely in Photoshop and would love feedback. This is far from finished so their might be spelling mistakes. I am trying to capture the persons attention within the first 3 seconds (like advertisers say to).

14049752
01-05-2009, 03:58 PM
It looks pretty good and is straight to the point.
The only spelling mistake I saw was the word implement.

I would probably suggest putting more contact information on the back side. E-mail address, phone, a point of contact if applicable.

rvdsabu4life
01-05-2009, 04:02 PM
The tagline looks awful familiar "Let us worry about your network, you have a business to run" Sort of similar to what we were using. Other then that, it looks nice.

I knew I saw that somewhere! No disrespect intended. I will change the tag line. I had another idea anyway. Sorry!

NYJimbo
01-05-2009, 04:09 PM
I knew I saw that somewhere! No disrespect intended. I will change the tag line. I had another idea anyway. Sorry!

It's kind of like every pizzeria in the USA has the same "You've tried the rest, now try the best" printed on their boxes and menus. :D

tartis
01-05-2009, 08:39 PM
I like the before and after photo. The paragraph on the right seems way too long. For an ad, it is hard to read.

cmonova
01-06-2009, 01:16 AM
I like the postcard with the 2 pics of a wiring job. But, maybe you would be better suited to use a smaller picture and putting more about what services you provide instead of taking all that space with the 2 pics.

Y.F.N.C.G.
01-06-2009, 03:13 AM
Looks good! The before and after pictures are very effective!

I didn't see any obvious contact info (website, phone number). That needs to be somewhere on the front too, since alot of businesses are too busy to flip to the back of the card. You might want to move that long descriptive paragraph on the front of the card to the back of the card...it's too jumled and distracting there on the front.

ProTech Support
01-06-2009, 01:42 PM
I would consider putting your companies contact info on the back of the card. Seems to be alot of space there, and I don't see contact info anywhere else....would suck to publish all those cards and wonder why there was absolutley no calls :p

JRDtechnet
01-07-2009, 07:03 AM
IMO it looks way to amateurish...cheesy bevel and emboss, all the same font with no typography other then adjusting font size, cheesy bevels, etc, etc.

Look at some professionally designed cards and see what they are doing, put some design elements in, edit that paragraph down, you don't need a whole sentence that says you've been in business since 1989...put 'Since 1989' near your business name. As for your business name it took me a minute to even figure it out, you have it same right next to Microsoft Small Business specialist, I thought it was a product you were selling not your actual business name. As others have mentioned, you need a phone number and a website on there...both sides.

Sorry to be so harsh but you wanted a critique. I worked in a print shop for almost 5 years designing direct mail pieces.

Oh and make sure you design it at 300dpi MINIMUM, 600 is prefered....1200 is even better.

navigatorrs
01-07-2009, 09:59 AM
I always put "10% off service calls" on all my post cards. It has worked real well for me!

rvdsabu4life
01-07-2009, 12:30 PM
Thanks for the info.

JRDtechnet, I appreciate the comments. My Photoshop is limited. I am going to make design text changes. I will take all your advice. Thanks!

nelsonm
01-08-2009, 11:57 PM
HI,

I Think some of the content is there - and as always, no insults intended - but i don't know what message your trying to convey. I see no incentive to use your service on the card. Also the fonts used do not convey professionalism. It looks local.

I got ideas about how to make the brochure look as professional as possible by looking at examples on the internet. If your not the creative type, just borrow some of the design ideas from online examples.

here is my brochure: http://www.nados.com/public/ncs.pdf

Although you can do most of it in photoshop, there are a few things like boarders that are a little difficult to do. I ended up producing the document in Adobe InDesign.

I hope this helps.

rvdsabu4life
01-09-2009, 12:12 PM
HI,

I Think some of the content is there - and as always, no insults intended - but i don't know what message your trying to convey. I see no incentive to use your service on the card. Also the fonts used do not convey professionalism. It looks local.

I got ideas about how to make the brochure look as professional as possible by looking at examples on the internet. If your not the creative type, just borrow some of the design ideas from online examples.

here is my brochure: http://www.nados.com/public/ncs.pdf

Although you can do most of it in photoshop, there are a few things like boarders that are a little difficult to do. I ended up producing the document in Adobe InDesign.

I hope this helps.

The big problem is that I was never good at advertising and graphic design. However, that is in my job description until we get big enough to hire someone else. I appreciate the input and yours looks awesome!

nelsonm
01-09-2009, 02:20 PM
I'm not that great at design either - trust me!:o That's why i used the internet as my new graphics and design employee.

I literally took design/content bits and pieces from various examples to come up with most of what i have. The some design and content and the way it's all arranged is my own. Besides the design, the most important thing is that it has all of the elements for good ad design, namely...

1. A professional look (clean design, easy to read)
2. The services offered
3. A tag line
4. One or two incentives or deals
5. Why should or when to your use our services
6. brand name promotion and phone number clearly seen
7. A hook or come on
8. Sound and look reasonable, don't promise the moon or walk on water
9. nice graphics, photos and colors

here is a quote from someone on the web that's says much of the same thing although i did not put a return address on my brochure...

Don’t want your direct mail to end up in the trash with the rest of the unread mail? Studies show an effective direct mail campaign should draw a .5 to 1 percent response. These 10 tips will help you get the results you want:

1. A clear, bold headline. On the envelope or front of the mailer there should be one central message. The best way to achieve that is with a bold, clear headline that’s not cluttered up with other text. A good guideline is to have the headline fill up at least 15% of the front of the mailer.

2. A graphic that supports the message. The graphic should be easy to understand and add to the message the headline is trying to convey. For instance, if you are trying to get people to list their home you would want to show a home with SOLD sign clearly visible out front. That graphic reinforces the message more than a simple picture of a home.

3. Color that pops. Make the headline and other text stand out by using a color that stands out from the background color. When you look at the card, ask yourself, "What do I see first?" If your answer isn't the headline, you might want to tweak the colors.

4. Subheads that lead into text. If you have a couple of paragraphs of text with no lead in, there’s nothing to entice people to actually read the copy. A subhead will give people a place to start reading. If you have only a 100 words or so you may be able to get away with it, but if the text gets any longer than that the average reader will want to have some guideposts along the way.

5. Benefits, benefits, benefits. One of the biggest errors people make in advertising is stating features, rather than benefits. For example, never assume recipients know what benefit can be derived from a lower interest rate on their mortgage. Let them know how their monthly payments will go down.

6. The offer. An offer is always a good idea and should represent a specific reason to call now, such as “Limited supply” or “Interest rates are climbing.”

7. Your company name and logo. Although this needs to be on the mailer, it shouldn’t overshadow the offer. Customers care most about what you can do for them.

8. Call to action. Tell prospects exactly what you want them to do. “Call today for more information” or “See us online” are two of the most common desired actions.

9. Contact information. Provide your name, phone number, and Web address directly following the call to action. Whatever you ask prospects to do, give them the means to do it easily.

10. Return address. A return address ensures you’ll get returned mail from the post office and sends a message that you’re an established professional. People feel better knowing the company they’re dealing with has an actual location.




Look, it took me about 4 months of total tinkering to get it looking like it does so don't get discouraged!