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View Full Version : How do you handle back ups?


Rider
12-10-2008, 08:57 PM
I deal with customers from all over the the country. When a customers computer has a problem I handle it one of two ways. Exchange: I send them a replacement computer and they send me thier bad one. Loaner: I send them a loaner computer, they send me thier broken one, I fix it and return it to them.

Here is where my problem is. I back up every computer's data when it comes in. There are two classes of data, irrigation data and personal data. Irrigation data is a no brainer, back it up and send it to them. Personal data however is a different story. I do not go through customers personal data hence I don't know what they have. It could be employee schedules or it could be child pronography. Therefore we don't send personal data and that irritates alot of customers. I'm not sure what other options there are.

I understand that most of you probably do business local versus through the mail but do you run into the same or similar dilemas? How do you handle it?

seedubya
12-10-2008, 10:04 PM
I find that, USUALLY, backing up the Documents and Settings folder in XP / Users Folder in Vista is sufficient. However we image ALL customer drives that come in onto a dedicated machine and retain for at least 30 days. Returning data to them usually isn't a problem as we either fix their existing computer and replace the data, replace their current computer and replace the data or THEY replace the computer and WE replace the data.

I can see how the postage thing adds to your headaches. Could you charge a fee to return data and put in on an external hard-disk where it's very large or on a series of DVD's where it's not?

usacvlr
12-11-2008, 06:25 PM
In the case of laptops which 99% of come in for hardware issues unrelated to the drive we tell them to remove the drive first before shipping it :)

Otherwise if a system comes in by walk in and I think there may be an issue with data loss or the customer specifically mentions data they want to keep either voluntarily or after I ask them then I just back it up to DVD-Rs.

layoric
12-11-2008, 06:32 PM
I only give them 7 days. Seven days to check that their files are there. Then I tell them I delete the backups.

iRecoverData.com (http://www.irecoverdata.com)

Simmy
12-11-2008, 06:47 PM
However we image ALL customer drives that come in onto a dedicated machine and retain for at least 30 days.

This - I do exactly the same. Always best to be safe than sorry - not only for the customer and their data but it also covers you. Plus if you use an acronis boot cd, you can image the drive over the network so you don't even have to open the customer's machine.

1Tb Hard drive in server - 70
Acronis True Image 2009 - 30
Having an original copy of the hard drive image and being able to prove to the customer that you haven't deleted a file - priceless...and very satisfying :D

usacvlr
12-11-2008, 09:38 PM
Spell it out in your agreement that the customer is responsible for backing up their data and not you before they drop off the system. Also carry errors and omissions coverage on your insurance policy.

seedubya
12-11-2008, 09:50 PM
Spell it out in your agreement that the customer is responsible for backing up their data and not you before they drop off the system. Also carry errors and omissions coverage on your insurance policy.

I already do both, but when you integrate drive cloning into your repair process much of the risk to you, REGARDLESS of Ts & Cs and insurance, is removed from the equation.

wareup
12-13-2008, 07:06 AM
I got the same problem before. Thats when I started using this image manager "Acronics"
I make a whole drive image and give it to them, I let them restore it on their side. So I only care for the media to transfer it, these days its not a problem with big files. I use DVDs and Removable HDD for that and I have messenger for courier purposes since mostly I deal with local client.

:)

lawson_jl
12-14-2008, 02:17 AM
I always ask my customers if they have their data backed up. I think all but 1person has given me the deer in the headlights look. I recently started a new "service" whenever I work on someone's PC, at no additional cost. I back up their data to a DVD-R while I'm servicing the computer. I back up My Documents, Favorites, Outlook (if they use it or whatever e-mail program they use). This is suffecent for 95% of users and most of it fits on 1 DVD-R. If they have a large amount of mp3s or videos I don't back them up. If they want a full PC back up that is extra.

I am looking for a good back up solution I can sell to customers. Perferably something I sell to them directly. It could be something that backs data up to an external drive or to a place in the "cloud." If anyone knows PM me or reply. Thanks.

solas
12-15-2008, 12:52 AM
I find that, USUALLY, backing up the Documents and Settings folder in XP / Users Folder in Vista is sufficient. However we image ALL customer drives that come in onto a dedicated machine and retain for at least 30 days. Returning data to them usually isn't a problem as we either fix their existing computer and replace the data, replace their current computer and replace the data or THEY replace the computer and WE replace the data.

I can see how the postage thing adds to your headaches. Could you charge a fee to return data and put in on an external hard-disk where it's very large or on a series of DVD's where it's not?
@seedubya What are you using to image the drives ?

seedubya
12-15-2008, 09:52 AM
I was using Ghost but I'm now using Acronis (with BootIT NG as backup).
I use hot-swappable hard drive trays rather than USB - it's too slow