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certifiedtek3
08-17-2006, 02:54 AM
Hello,

I need some advice from techs that owned or own their own business.
The problem I am having on site at the customer's house or business is that a lot of the customers just will not leave me alone to focus on diagnosing the problem. For example, continually are looking over my shoulder bombarding me with questions trying to get as much free advice is possible while I'm trying to get to the solution of their current problem. This is making me nervous and breaks my concentration so that I can't think methodically and analytically in use my deductive reasoning to get to the solution quickly. I'm looking for an assertive way to tell the customer to let me do my job without offending them. Any suggestions? This is driving me nuts I think I'm not going to do on site anymore just have it dropped off.
Thanks, Jeff

Bryce W
08-17-2006, 10:32 PM
95% of my work is onsite and I dont really have the problem of people talking to me when I am trying to think.

I do have people watch me but they are typically quiet. Perhaps I look like I am really trying to concerntrate and they pick up on that?

My advice is to just tell them "I will answer all your questions in a few minutes. I just need to concerntrate at the moment"

certifiedtek3
08-18-2006, 04:22 AM
Your fortunate, I live in the US the Boston area rudeness is commonplace here along with courtesy/consideration for some.

Bryce W
08-18-2006, 11:09 PM
Another thought is to stop working and answer all their questions. They will soon realise that by them talking to you, you arent getting anything done and costing them more... which means more money for you :D

techbyte
08-21-2006, 01:54 AM
Second that (95%; stop working) plus I usually chat on arrival to get as much info as possible, then say something along the lines of "OK well I'll sit down and have a good look at the problem and call you if I have any questions..." or whatever, which is basically a nice way of saying you need to quietly concentrate on your own... :)

Also in time they'll get to know you and leave you alone (think I read that somewhere else in the forums) and I now regularly get left in the house by myself or updated on their divorce, etc!

wfdTamar
09-07-2006, 09:42 PM
...then say something along the lines of "OK well I'll sit down and have a good look at the problem and call you if I have any questions..." or whatever, which is basically a nice way of saying you need to quietly concentrate on your own... :)

I like that. I have told clients that talking (or rather listening) does slow me down, but some don't give you the chance to get a word in. I once had a clients teenage son sit next to me on an important job, nervously tapping his leg the whole time (10 hours). I stupidly didn't stop it early on.

I am leaning more and more towards taking computers home to do as it's becoming difficult to do the work economically in the clients home. There are so many advantages, faster Internet access, comfort (so many people have bad ergonomics), no pesky client to see your mistakes, having multiple jobs running together (while waiting for downloads, installs & scans).

Bryce W
09-07-2006, 09:58 PM
Really good advice guys. I typically take systems back to my office if I know if its going to be a long or difficult job. For example, if I have to a recovery and reinstall of XP. I have spare harddrives and such to load their files onto and when the system is installing XP I can work on another machine as wfdTamar mentioned.

For my really good clients, I will talk to them alot while I am waiting for a update to install/download and cant do anything while its happening. I ask them about their new renovations to their house and they show me. I 'ooh and ahh' about it.
This builds up trust and friendships and lessens the chance of them getting another tech to fix their computer.

Blues
09-08-2006, 06:24 PM
Yes I have had to do restores on systems and such and those I do take home or data back ups. If the person can not specify what to back up in which case I have spent 3 hours doing back ups with them telling me what to back up. The only long jobs I have done onsite are setup/installation this is taking a new system they have just purchased setting it up and installing thier new software onsite and running updates. I run the updates because I don't want to get a call 15 minutes after I leave asking me what this is that just popped up as well it increases the security of the machine. Many of the people I have worked for are far from technically knowledgable so I inform them about the updates why I do them and how they can do them. I tell them how to update because while the extra money would be nice it doesn't seem right for such a simple thing inaddition I don't want to have to go out there that frequently. If I know a system will need updates and the person is not on a high speed connection I will then take a system home to run the updates on my high speed internet. The issue of talking I tend to pause and answer but often times I am not bothered. There are times when people talk to me sometimes just chatting and if it is chit chat then I will answer if I can manage it other times I pause and ask them to repeat themselves. Overall I have little trouble with things and tend to not spend too much time in thier homes.

Contra
08-27-2009, 04:49 AM
Another thought is to stop working and answer all their questions. They will soon realise that by them talking to you, you arent getting anything done and costing them more... which means more money for you :D

i agree with this, first ask them to give you a few min to concentrate and preform the work they are paying for, then if they continue to bug you remove your hands from the keyboard and turn toward them and procede to answer all their questions, but as I do before you start a job get them to sign acknolegement that all work is per hour and payment is due at the conclusion of the work

don't be rude just allow them to shoot themselves in the foot if they want