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View Full Version : Password Recovery - What would you do???


C6Gunner
11-17-2008, 03:25 PM
Hey TNs,

This may be a good one to ask you guys:

I just got off the phone with a distraught man that wanted me to recover Facebook and Email passwords. I obviously asked if these were his personal passwords, and he admitted that the accounts belonged to his wife, and that he suspected her of having an affair.

After asking a few more questions, I told him that I just could not ethically, and probably should not legally, get him access to those accounts. I decided to point him in the 'right direction' to retrieve the info himself.

How would you guys have handled this one???

NWPhotog
11-17-2008, 03:31 PM
Not with 100' pole. Last thing I want to do is be dragged into court.

gunslinger
11-17-2008, 04:39 PM
I would have to agree with NWPhotog on this one.

iptech
11-17-2008, 04:53 PM
^^^ What they said.

I've just had a very similar situation. I would not help recover a password from an adult's account without the owner's explicit permission. It is however, quite legal to sell a keylogger. ;)

MrMille
11-17-2008, 05:48 PM
You can't recover the facebook password

bagellad
11-17-2008, 07:06 PM
If he already suspects to the point of having to spy on her From my point of view they are doomed. you should point him to a lawyer. I don't think I would get involved. Although at one point I did toy with the idea of becoming a private investigator with a computer focus. If you did decide to help him I would atleast double or triple you normal fee because this one is going to end up being a BIG HASSLE and also have him sign something saying that he states to being the owner of the computer and is doing this by his request and accepts all liability etc. etc. .

TimeCode
11-17-2008, 07:54 PM
^^^ What they said.

I've just had a very similar situation. I would not help recover a password from an adult's account without the owner's explicit permission. It is however, quite legal to sell a keylogger. ;)
Exactly... let him do the snooping himself. be sure NOT to install it for him. That could definitely be trouble!

gunslinger
11-17-2008, 08:41 PM
Again I agree with the above posts. I would hook him up with a good keylogger for a fee and maybe show him how to use it on my computer.

If it were kids things would be different.

NWPhotog
11-17-2008, 09:25 PM
^^^ What they said.

I've just had a very similar situation. I would not help recover a password from an adult's account without the owner's explicit permission. It is however, quite legal to sell a keylogger. ;)

I would never help someone spy on someone else. You have no way of knowing who is in the right and who is being abusive. Personally I think it is irresponsible for someone in our profession to do so but even from a pragmatic point of view it just does not make sense.

iptech
11-17-2008, 11:28 PM
I was originally called in because the guy (a customer for several years) had good reason to suspect his 14 year old daughter was involved in a sexual relationship with a man much older than herself. From examining the MSN chat logs on the daughter's PC it was pretty obvious these were not the messages of a pre-pubescent girl but of a sexually adventurous female adult i.e. the young girl's mother and my customer's wife. Without going into details there were also explicit self-photos that would have been accessible to anyone using that PC. :eek:

A divorce is now in petition.

As a point of UK law (and I believe US law), if a keylogger was used by a parent to monitor the online activity of their under 18 year old child then it is perfectly lawful, in fact many parental control packages include the facility to surreptitiously monitor chatroom logs etc.

gunslinger
11-18-2008, 01:53 AM
I use a keylogger to monitor the online activity of my kids. It come in handy many times.

NWPhotog
11-18-2008, 04:07 AM
I was originally called in because the guy (a customer for several years) had good reason to suspect his 14 year old daughter was involved in a sexual relationship with a man much older than herself. From examining the MSN chat logs on the daughter's PC it was pretty obvious these were not the messages of a pre-pubescent girl but of a sexually adventurous female adult i.e. the young girl's mother and my customer's wife. Without going into details there were also explicit self-photos that would have been accessible to anyone using that PC. :eek:

A divorce is now in petition.

As a point of UK law (and I believe US law), if a keylogger was used by a parent to monitor the online activity of their under 18 year old child then it is perfectly lawful, in fact many parental control packages include the facility to surreptitiously monitor chatroom logs etc.

I think your example illustrates what I was attempting to say. The customer lied to you to spy on his wife. For all we know he started cheating before the wife did. It is just too messy from a human and legal point to even touch.

iptech
11-18-2008, 07:54 AM
A customer lied - never!

If you're worried about customers lying, don't ever get involved in warranty returns. :cool:

MrMille
11-18-2008, 11:28 AM
It's all well and good discussing the morality of the issue,
but if you can't actually retrieve the password, the point is mote.

I could access such an account myself, by other means,
but nobody has mentioned how someone else might do it.

gunslinger
11-18-2008, 11:59 AM
It's all well and good discussing the morality of the issue,
but if you can't actually retrieve the password, the point is mote.

I could access such an account myself, by other means,
but nobody has mentioned how someone else might do it.

A keylogger would work very well here. catches every password typed. I have also found that Norton would let me run a keylogger with no worries. Not so with other programs like Kaspersky and AVG.

C6Gunner
11-18-2008, 08:15 PM
Gunslinger,

Which keylogger do you use/prefer? There are so many (I found 12!) out there.