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d3v
01-31-2012, 11:32 AM
I'm trying to image a badly damaged 3.5" SATA hard drive using the free Ubuntu Rescue Remix 11.5 live CD and have printed off all the DD rescue documentation and have the thing running in a virtual machine for practice, but there's not a single damm word on how one would actually list all devices and paritions connected the the PC.

Why would such a basic and fundamentally important step not be covered in the literature? This is why I never bothered to learn Linux becuase it's shell commands fetish and the program makers' infuriating habbit of only telling you half of what you need to know is downright bloody ridiculous, why the hell havn't they developed a UI yet? ARRRRRRRGH so infuriating :mad:

Shark
01-31-2012, 12:00 PM
lspci (http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/jaunty/man8/lspci.8.html)

This lists all PCI devices.

fdisk -l and sfdisk

iisjman07
01-31-2012, 01:05 PM
I wrote a little tutorial here (http://www.technibble.com/forums/showpost.php?p=237901&postcount=3)

d3v
01-31-2012, 01:22 PM
righteo thanks for that, I knew I could trust this place for basic sanity. Excellent, I will now attempt to recover the data from this drive and will let you know how it goes :D

codegreen
01-31-2012, 01:33 PM
Why would such a basic and fundamentally important step not be covered in the literature?

Linux is based on the Unix philosophy of many small tools working together, and official documentation for Linux tools tends to assume basic Linux experience. This can be infuriating to people coming from the Windows world. In this case, the ddrescue documentation would not outline how list devices and partitions because that's not handled by this particular utility.

If you're going to use ddrescue, you should search for a new user tutorial (like the one linked above). But you will have to learn the basics of a Unix-style command line. If you want Windows-style tools, you should try a Windows-based rescue disk.

MobileTechie
01-31-2012, 02:11 PM
if you're running it from a rescue disk like parted magic or whatever then those normally have tools like file managers that allow you to browse to find the volume you need and then look at the path to see which name the disk has. Or gparted shows you a Disk Manager like view which might help. For sure you need to be very careful about getting the volume right!

d3v
01-31-2012, 03:24 PM
Ok I'm learning this tool now and beginning to understand the way it works thanks to you guys putting me in the right direction.

The drive in question is mechanically faulty and when connected to the PC it causes intemittent freezing of the PC and while I can access the drives partitions in windows, navigation is painfully slow.

Based on that information, what method of cloning/recovery would you guys reccomend I perform in DDrescue, including the actual code string that I should type, so I can print it off and obviously replace the "dev/***" bits with my own.

codegreen
01-31-2012, 05:08 PM
Based on that information, what method of cloning/recovery would you guys reccomend I perform in DDrescue, including the actual code string that I should type, so I can print it off and obviously replace the "dev/***" bits with my own.

I would do this in two passes.

Pass 1:

ddrescue /dev/*** hdimage.img rescue.log

This will attempt to image the entire drive. Any unreadable sectors will be skipped after the initial attempt to copy them.


Replace "/dev/***" with the failing hard drive (normally /dev/sda if you're booting from a live CD).
"hdimage.img" is the name of the image file you're creating. If you're not in the location you want to save the image to, you'll need to put the full path here (usually /media/<name of external hardrive>/ for a USB-connected hard drive).
"rescue.log" is the log file. This allows ddrescue to keep track of what it has already done. Very useful for doing multiple passes or dealing unexpected interruptions. Always use a log file! Like the mage file, you'll need the full path if you're not in the directory you want to save the fle to.


Pass 2:

ddrescue -d -r3 /dev/*** hdimage.img rescue.log

This will attempt to re-read and copy any sectors that were missed by the first pass, and it will skip all sectors that were successfully copied. -d means it will attempt direct disc access (bypassing the kernal cache) and -r3 means it will attempt to read each bad sector 3 times. Use the same image and log file as the first pass; otherwise it will attempt to mage the entire drive again.

d3v
01-31-2012, 06:43 PM
Wow, now that is exactly what I wanted, thank you for being so clear and helpful, but I'm still not sure about how to create a path location to save the recovered image and logfile to. It's nothing like the way Windows is!!

The faulty drive is connected to the SATA bay that is built-in to my PC case chassis and is connected directly to my motherboards SATA controller. This is a god send for quick and easy backups/recoveries. The chassis SATA bay is connected to the 2nd SATA channel, and my internal hard drive is connected to the 1st SATA channel.

My internal hard drive will be where I want the image to be saved to, so how would I go about typing the correct line of code for this? I'm guessing...

ddrescue /dev/faultydrive /dev/internaldrive hdimage.img rescue.log

??

codegreen
01-31-2012, 07:22 PM
Please insert the faulty drive into the bay, boot from the live CD, and paste the results of these commands:

fdisk -l
df

I can give you more specific help once I see that info. You have to be very careful to write the data to the right place. In Linux, you do not write files to a raw storage device (like /dev/sda), but to a mounted filesystem.

d3v
01-31-2012, 07:41 PM
http://www.pic-nerd.com/v2/images/qu543bxuwp70sfm6g515.jpg


The 500 and 640GB drives are both my internal hard drives. The damm faulty drive has not been detected properly! Dammit, how do I proceed?
Oh and before I hit the terminal window there were hundreds of I/O errors being reported!

and the other image...

http://www.pic-nerd.com/v2/images/2sxdoicmm18dhp9xhcv.jpg

d3v
01-31-2012, 07:53 PM
Just to clarify, my PC storage devices are connected as follows...

HDD 1 (windows): SATA channel 0
HDD 2 (data, backups): SATA channel 1
Optical drive: SATA channel 2
PC chassis SATA bay: SATA channel 3

The faulty drive is 160GB and has two Windows paritions.

NETWizz
01-31-2012, 07:56 PM
You cannot use DD-Rescue on a drive that the BIOS does not pick-up/communicate with. If the BIOS cannot see it, the Operating System (Windows, Linux, etc...) cannot see it either..

If it is not listed, you can't do anything with it besides perhaps replacing the logic board on the drive to make it recognizable again... For this you usually need special training (or at least a website that sells logic boards for your EXACT drive)... Usually, you have to send them the old board.

^^^ This is what a recovery place like Knoll Ontrack would do. They would try specialized software with a specialized OS written in assmebly, and if they cannot communicate or even see a connected drive, they would replace teh electronics on the back and try to spin-it up and communicate.

Provided there is not too much physical damage and the motor still works... you wouldn't need a clean room.


*******************************************

DD Rescue seems to work the same as DD (at least as far as its syntax goes)... Obviously, it continues where DD gives up.

d3v
01-31-2012, 07:59 PM
You cannot use DD-Rescue on a drive that the BIOS does not pick-up/communicate with. If the BIOS cannot see it, the Operating System (Windows, Linux, etc...) cannot see it either..

If it is not listed, you can't do anything with it besides perhaps replacing the logic board on the drive to make it recognizable again... For this you usually need special training (or at least a website that sells logic boards for your EXACT drive)... Usually, you have to send them the old board.

^^^ This is what a recovery place like Knoll Ontrack would do. They would try specialized software with a specialized OS written in assmebly, and if they cannot communicate or even see a connected drive, they would replace teh electronics on the back and try to spin-it up and communicate.

Provided there is not too much physical damage and the motor still works... you wouldn't need a clean room.


*******************************************

DD Rescue seems to work the same as DD (at least as far as its syntax goes)... Obviously, it continues where DD gives up.

My BIOS does agknowledge the drive during POST, and I would of thought if Windows could recognize and allow me to browse the drive then this ddrescue wouldn't have any trouble. I'm confused:confused:

brb going for a run to de-stress. would appreciate any further help, though!!

codegreen
01-31-2012, 08:20 PM
OK. You need to mount one of your internal drives so that Linux can write the image file to it. So, if you want to write the file to a folder on your 640 GB drive:

sudo mkdir /media/storage
sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/storage

Linux can now write to your 640gb drive. Change /dev/sdb1 with /dev/sda2 if you want to write to a folder on the 500 gb drive instead.

cd /media/storage
ls

You should see the list of folders on the drive. Use the "cd" command to move to the folder you want to save the rescue image and log file to. Use "mkdir" to create a new folder if needed. Once you're in the right place:

ddrescue /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log

Let that run its course, and then:

ddrescue -d -r3 /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log

I saw that fdisk is throwing an error trying to read the partition table on the damaged drive. However, the drive itself is beng recognized. ddrescue does a sector-by-sector copy and doesn't work with the filesystem, so it may be able to get an image. You'll still have to do filesystem recovery after that.

if you do get the image, and you need help mounting it and recovering files and/or partitions, let me know.

PLEASE NOTE: ddrescue is very powerful, but also dangerous. It is possible to overwrite your own data if you are not careful. I'm happy to help, but I can't take any responsibility if things don't go as planned. ;)

codegreen
01-31-2012, 08:24 PM
You cannot use DD-Rescue on a drive that the BIOS does not pick-up/communicate with. If the BIOS cannot see it, the Operating System (Windows, Linux, etc...) cannot see it either..

True. However, the disk is being recognized. Linux sees the drive as /dev/sdc, but fdisk is unable to read the partition table.

NETWizz
01-31-2012, 08:35 PM
I think he is saying he has a third drive that doesn't show up in fdisk with fdisk -l.

Now, apparently, that is not at all what he is saying. :p

Being new to Linux, he might not know that some shells are very particular and this might not work:
ddrescue /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log

With many shells, to run a program you need ./ in front of it to Verify you want to run an executable binary. It does not presume necessarily you want to run executables in the working directory depending upon the shell and the configuration files for the shell.

If not, this would likely work (if dd-rescue is in your current directory and marked execute):
./ddrescue /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log


Also, that said, the Working Directory must be to a writable place like /media/storage

For example:
cd /media/storage
ddrescue /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log

You can check your working directory with this:
pwd

This would be another way to do the same thing:
ddrescue /dev/sdc /media/storage/hdimage.img /media/storage/rescue.log



When all done, make sure to unmount, so the file-system will commit its changes properly.

umount /dev/sdb1

Of course, you can see any mounted filesystems with:
mount

d3v
01-31-2012, 11:49 PM
codegreen you are a saint! I printed off your email and keyed in each line of code pretty much exactly how you stated and I'm very relieved that the image is finally being created. It seems to be stuck at 119000 megabytes and the drive is getting very warm. Should I cancel and resume the process later or wait in hope that the remaining 41000 megabytes gets cloned before the drive gets proper trashed?

@NETWizz thanks for your input, I will make sure to unmount the drive before rebooting, thanks for the tip :)

thank god I had a customer today, so I'm on his laptop now and can ask for advice while ddrescue does it's magic on my PC :D

edit: it's been "splitting failed blocks" for the past hour!

Galdorf
02-01-2012, 12:59 AM
I use to use ddrescue but i have found imaging software that does basically the same thing call hdclone (http://www.miray.de/products/sat.hdclone.html#prof) and has a very small learning curve it first does a data recovery skipping over the bad sectors when it gets to end it gives you the option to skip or try to recover the data on the bad sectors.

Its not cheap 83.19 € but its worth it it is pretty fast compared to ddrescue and has a nice easy menu system, i have done quite a bit of data recovery and got fantastic results with the software.

http://www.miray.de/public/screenshots/sat.hdclone.4.1.pe.en.png

d3v
02-01-2012, 01:11 AM
Ok just went upstairs and it had finished cloning!

Now there was some sort of yes/no prompt asking me something along the lines of "show all possiblities?" So I chose YES and then the entire terminal filled up with commands and I could not scroll back up to read the succesful clone results in more detail.

I've just tried to unmount the drive that the clone was saved to, but was told it was busy and could not unmount, no idea what to do now, will check google while awaiting response here.

@Galdorg thanks for the tip, anyone else know if this software is as good/better than ddrescue??

d3v
02-01-2012, 08:07 AM
Still stuck, no idea how to proceed. Google returned information on the "drive busy" error, but none of the commands mentioned worked :confused:

codegreen
02-01-2012, 09:24 AM
I've just tried to unmount the drive that the clone was saved to, but was told it was busy and could not unmount, no idea what to do now, will check google while awaiting response here.

Linux can't unmount a disk when it's in use, such as when your current working directory is on the disk. Type "cd /", then "sudo umount /dev/sdb1" (or replace with whatever drive you mounted; use "df" to check if not sure).


@Galdorg thanks for the tip, anyone else know if this software is as good/better than ddrescue??

I've never tried it. Most disk imaging software is designed for backup, and is not suitable for data recovery. However, this software features include a "SafeRescue" mode. It has a limited functionality free version, so it might be worth testing for future jobs.

d3v
02-01-2012, 11:09 AM
You have saved me once again. I'm now fully unmounted and and awaiting my next orders. Can I exit ddrescue and reboot in to windows now? Or must I do execute other commands or anything??

How do I use this image file? Is it like an ISO that I can see the recovered files in all their glory or is it in some sort of RAW format that requires extra work??

Galdorf
02-01-2012, 11:48 AM
Its pretty simple really with hdclone pop in the rescue cd hook up an external drive or remove the drive and put it on bench computer run hdclone say no to try to recover data on bad sectors, create a standard image file load up f-studio or similar recovery software mount or run recovery on image.

For recovery of data where bad sectors are there is really no software suitable for that you need hardware like deepspar disk imager it's about $2000-$3000 dollars.

There is a course you can take from myharddrivedied.com they give you manuals,videos and tools and some software its $3000.

Distance Learning Kit hardware list

1x Book that is the Lecture and Slides used in the class, also includes 20 labs.
1x Head Platter Replacement Tool that includes a Lab Bench Stand,
1x 3.5” Platter tool,
1x 2.5” Platter tool,
1 Magnetic Voice Coil removal tool.
1x Set of Screwdrivers that includes Torx drivers necessary for small hard drives from T4-T8 for 2.5 in hard drives.
1x Set of Screwdrivers that includes Philips and Flathead drivers needed for small hard drives.
1x Set of MP3’s that includes 40 hours of class that can be used in mobile players or computer, or car CD player.
4x Hard drives for practice and are the items used in the class room and on the Videos. 1x Set of Straws, Post It Notes, Plastic for Head Assemblies
1x USB hard drive connector that includes 2.5”, 3.5” and SATA connectors
1x Fine Metal Tweezers
1x Static Mat
1x Set of Static Gloves
2x Bootable CDs with additional Software
1x Flash Memory Stick with Special Format for Discovery in the Class
1x Voucher for the Certification Test
1x Set of Videos of how to use the DeepSpar Disk Imager and the Forensic Disk Imager.

Distance Learning Kit software list

The software and licenses for the recovery software that will be your property for the items designed for the class and are taught in the manual. It will include licenses of

R-Studio,
R-Studio for Linux,
Runtime GetDataBack NTFS,
Disk Explorer for NTFS,
GetDataBack for Fat,
DiskExplorer for Fat,
Raid Reconstructor,
Captain Nemo Pro,
SpeedClone 2003

And copies of these other great packages:

Victoria,
MHDD,
TestDisk,
FTK Imager,
HFS Explorer as well as 20 others I have collected.

Video and Audio

1x Set of High Quality Videos and MP3 audio recordings of the classes. It is an actual video of the class with all 40 hours.

Mentoring

The ability to converse with Scott Moulton via email to help mentor and answer specific questions.
Data Recovery Expert Certification

After passing the certification exam with a 70 or better, you will also be sent a high quality sealed certification for framing. If you fail the certification exam, you can retake the exam for $50.

$3000 might sound like alot at first but if there are no data recovery companies where you live like where i am, i make quite a bit of money doing data recovery as long as the drive is visible i can recover data.

d3v
02-01-2012, 12:24 PM
It's certainly a lucrative market that's for sure, but there's no way in hell I could afford $3000. I barely get any work, in fact the two jobs yesterday ended a full two week dry spell. I regulary go without work for 2-3 weeks. The past year has been terrible for me!

I intend to learn ddrescue further, so that I will be able to accept more data recovery work. This learning package does look like a properly thought-out course and the kit you get looks top notch, but I don't think I'll EVER make enough money to afford the $3000 price tag.

d3v
02-01-2012, 01:02 PM
Ok I exited the ddrescue terminal becuase I badly needed the use of the PC. As soon as I booted in to Windows I checked for the hdimage.img and rescue.log files and sure enough they are there in the root of my primary hard drive.

Now I just need to be able to open and navigate hdimage.img to be able to actually extract this guys files! I was hoping UltraISO would open the file, but did not work :rolleyes:

I will wait for codegreen :D

Galdorf
02-01-2012, 01:59 PM
Ok I exited the ddrescue terminal becuase I badly needed the use of the PC. As soon as I booted in to Windows I checked for the hdimage.img and rescue.log files and sure enough they are there in the root of my primary hard drive.

Now I just need to be able to open and navigate hdimage.img to be able to actually extract this guys files! I was hoping UltraISO would open the file, but did not work :rolleyes:

I will wait for codegreen :D

You need to either mount the image or have a data recovery software that can run recovery on the image.

for free you could try Data Disc Recovery (http://dagsoft.eu/download,4,index.html) or

PC Inspector File Recovery (http://www.pcinspector.de/Default.htm?language=1) i use this software seems to be the best free software.

codegreen
02-01-2012, 02:12 PM
Linux can mount such images directly. However, you'll probably do better to use Windows-based tools from this point on, especially since you need to use your computer for other things. :)

Before doing anything with the image, make a copy of it. Do any recovery work from the copy; don't touch the original. The reason is, if you mess up in your recovery efforts, you simply make another copy from the original and try again. If you work directly from the original image, any mistakes will force you to take another image from the failing drive. Save yourself a world of hurt and work only from a copy.

Windows can't mount imaged filesystems directly. You'll need additional software to do it. OSFMount (http://www.osforensics.com/tools/mount-disk-images.html) is a free utility that should do the trick. Virtual CloneDrive (http://www.slysoft.com/en/virtual-clonedrive.html) is pretty popular, but it is primarily meant for mount ISO files; I'm not sure how well it handles raw drive images.

Once you have the image copy mounted, you can proceed with file recovery. You can safely run chkdsk now, since if chkdsk trashes the filesystem, you can just make another copy of the image and try something else. If you're not able to copy files off using standard Windows methods, you'll have to try some kind of file/partition recovery software. I do most of my data recovery in Linux, so I can't really offer much help past this point. R-Tools seems to be highly regarded around here, but it's not free. Search the forums for previous discussions. However, watch out for this article (http://www.technibble.com/performing-data-recovery/). It gives a lot of advice I would consider... questionable, at best. :( Good luck, and let us know how it turns out!

d3v
02-01-2012, 03:39 PM
THANK YOU SOO MUCH!

I just mounted the image in OSForensics and can now navigate and copy all the files perfectly, thank god there dosn't seem to be any need for a filesystem repair or any other further hassle.

I'm just transfering his massive 50GB user account so I hope it transfers ok without error!!

Will keep updated!!

edit: ALL DONE! Transfer was flawless.

Massive thanks to codegreen. If you lived closer I'd cook you one of my my speciality chicken korma's, but instead I will put in a reccomendation to the vatican that you be no less than sainted. This should be a sticky becuase I would imagine this would be very usful for a lot of us here!

codegreen
02-01-2012, 06:34 PM
ALL DONE! Transfer was flawless. Massive thanks to codegreen.

I'm glad to hear it, and you're very welcome! I'll try to rework the material in this thread into a proper guide.

d3v
02-01-2012, 07:11 PM
I'm glad to hear it, and you're very welcome! I'll try to rework the material in this thread into a proper guide.

Good idea, this is a life saver for us Windows user's.

Galdorf
02-01-2012, 07:44 PM
Most forensic software has an imager that is capable of creating an image while skipping the bad sectors allowing for data recovery, most are free here is a list.

FTK Imager (http://accessdata.force.com/RegisterForDownload?redirectName=000051) part of ftk forensics
OSForensics (http://www.osforensics.com/)
Guymager (http://guymager.sourceforge.net/)

for mounting images:
OSFmount (http://www.osforensics.com/tools/mount-disk-images.html)
P2 eXplorer Free
(http://www.paraben.com/p2-explorer.html)

Other useful tools:

Encrypted Disk Detector (http://www.jadsoftware.com/?page_id=89)
Live View (http://liveview.sourceforge.net/)

d3v
02-04-2012, 03:34 PM
thanks Galdorf, I'll bookmark them links in my data recovery folder.

Here's a rough guide that I made by consolidating codegreen's advice throught this thread. This will be essential for a Windows user with minimal Linux knowledge like myself!

1. SELECTING DRIVES
-----------------------------
Connect the faulty drive to your PC, boot to ddrescue then type the following commands to determine the designation ddrescue has assigned to all your connected storage devices

sudo fdisk -l
sudo df

I can give you more specific help once I see that info. You have to be very careful to write the data to the right place. In Linux, you do not write files to a raw storage device (like /dev/sda), but to a mounted filesystem.
2. MOUNTING
-------------------
OK. Now you need to mount one of your internal drives so that Linux can write the image file to it. So, if you want to write the file to a folder on your 640 GB drive:
sudo mkdir /media/storage
sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/storage

Linux can now write to your 640gb drive. Change /dev/sdb1 with /dev/sda2 if you want to write to a folder on the 500 gb drive instead.
cd /media/storage
ls

You should see the list of folders on the drive. Use the "cd" command to move to the folder you want to save the rescue image and log file to. Use "mkdir" to create a new folder if needed. Once you're in the right place:

3. DATA RECOVERY
----------------------------------

ddrescue /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log

Let that run its course, and then:
ddrescue -d -r3 /dev/sdc hdimage.img rescue.log

I saw that fdisk is throwing an error trying to read the partition table on the damaged drive. However, the drive itself is beng recognized. ddrescue does a sector-by-sector copy and doesn't work with the filesystem, so it may be able to get an image. You'll still have to do filesystem recovery after that.

if you do get the image, and you need help mounting it and recovering files and/or partitions, let me know.

PLEASE NOTE: ddrescue is very powerful, but also dangerous. It is possible to overwrite your own data if you are not careful. I'm happy to help, but I can't take any responsibility if things don't go as planned.

UNMOUNTING
---------------------------
Originally Posted by d3v file:///C:/Users/Jim/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image001.gif (http://www.technibble.com/forums/showthread.php?p=268331#post268331)
I've just tried to unmount the drive that the clone was saved to, but was told it was busy and could not unmount, no idea what to do now, will check google while awaiting response here.

Linux can't unmount a disk when it's in use, such as when your current working directory is on the disk. Type "cd /", then "sudo umount /dev/sdb1" (or replace with whatever drive you mounted; use "df" to check if not sure).

Linux can mount such images directly. However, you'll probably do better to use Windows-based tools from this point on, especially since you need to use your computer for other things. file:///C:/Users/Jim/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image002.gif

Before doing anything with the image, make a copy of it. Do any recovery work from the copy; don't touch the original. The reason is, if you mess up in your recovery efforts, you simply make another copy from the original and try again. If you work directly from the original image, any mistakes will force you to take another image from the failing drive. Save yourself a world of hurt and work only from a copy.

Windows can't mount imaged filesystems directly. You'll need additional software to do it. OSFMount (http://www.osforensics.com/tools/mount-disk-images.html) is a free utility that should do the trick. Virtual CloneDrive (http://www.slysoft.com/en/virtual-clonedrive.html) is pretty popular, but it is primarily meant for mount ISO files; I'm not sure how well it handles raw drive images.

Once you have the image copy mounted, you can proceed with file recovery. You can safely run chkdsk now, since if chkdsk trashes the filesystem, you can just make another copy of the image and try something else. If you're not able to copy files off using standard Windows methods, you'll have to try some kind of file/partition recovery software. I do most of my data recovery in Linux, so I can't really offer much help past this point. R-Tools seems to be highly regarded around here, but it's not free. Search the forums for previous discussions. However, watch out for this article (http://www.technibble.com/forums/../performing-data-recovery/). It gives a lot of advice I would consider... questionable, at best. file:///C:/Users/Jim/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image003.gifGood luck, and let us know how it turns out!

Nemo
02-14-2012, 02:38 PM
Hi All You Saints :)

a month ago, my 1.5TB HDD went mad = became RAW, was making noises...etc

oh happy me!!

my life was in there (photos and videos of my family, my mariage, my sons...my life I told you)

no windows based software was able to save my data (get data back...etc)

Check dsk was useless, Tesdisk : same thing

and I found this forum

And the light was

Since last Friday (10th feb 2012 night) I'm running, god bless it, DDrescue!

Even if I'm quite confident, I ask my self : is it normal that it takes all this time? 4 days running, and only half way to do the job!
well I know, 1.5TB is not little, but ...

I'll Join to this reply a screen shot oh my pc screen (taken yesterday)

so my questions, if I may ask, are:

1- Is it normal to take all this time?
2- Is the size of errors alarming?
3- If one of you was a medium: Am I having any chance to recover my presious data?

even if I do not have answers to all these questions, I want to thank you all for the great help I found here!

so ThnX

NeMo:cool:

codegreen
02-14-2012, 03:14 PM
Hi All You Saints :)


Not saints, just technicians. :) The Technibble forums are for technician to technician conversations; this isn't a place for end users to get support. However, some quick answers...


1- Is it normal to take all this time?


No. Normally, ddrescue skips unreadable sectors and continues on. the "-r 3" option you used has ddrescue retrying each unreadable sector three times before moving on. You don't want to do this for a first pass.


2- Is the size of errors alarming?


Yes. Sadly, your drive seems badly damaged.


3- If one of you was a medium: Am I having any chance to recover my presious data?


Hard to say. You may want to stop your efforts and look into professional data recovery services. Or, you could try this forum (http://ubuntu-rescue-remix.org/forum/1) for some end-user help.

Nemo
02-14-2012, 03:43 PM
OK OK
even if I'm not a Pro Technician, I love solving by my own my problems...
of course, if it's not possible, I'm refering to a "real" pro...

I know there is little chance to recover "all" my data, my hope is to save the maximum

well, Thanks any way,

I'll try to keep you informed

parker.casey
02-14-2012, 04:15 PM
I'm trying to image a badly damaged 3.5" SATA hard drive using the free Ubuntu Rescue Remix 11.5 live CD and have printed off all the DD rescue documentation and have the thing running in a virtual machine for practice, but there's not a single damm word on how one would actually list all devices and paritions connected the the PC.

Why would such a basic and fundamentally important step not be covered in the literature? This is why I never bothered to learn Linux becuase it's shell commands fetish and the program makers' infuriating habbit of only telling you half of what you need to know is downright bloody ridiculous, why the hell havn't they developed a UI yet? ARRRRRRRGH so infuriating :mad:

No GUI because GUI's add a bunch of requirements to a program. It's meant to be able to be scripted and whatnot.

Basically, Linux was intended for the server market. If you need a monitor, keyboard, and mouse to work with a server, you need a desktop instead.

d3v
02-23-2012, 10:32 AM
Good to see this thread is getting use, thanks to codegreen. I don't think there is another guide on ddrescue as good as this thread!

Ok I'm in need of some advise on what to do with this data rescue from a friends SD flash card!

I took this photo when it was 8 hours in to the ddrescue recovery process and as you can see if you follow the commands I typed, it's not even past the first stage of recovery. This morning it has been running for 18 hours and STILL absolutely no data has been rescued.

The SD card is connected to the PC via a Hama 35 in 1 card USB 2.0 card reader...

http://www.warehouseexpress.com/webcontent/product_images/large/95/1023907.jpg

And the screen photo...

http://www.pic-nerd.com/v2/images/uykacc19yxzzwgs22cm9.jpg


Should I let it continue to run in the hope it will eventually start to recover data or should I pull the plug and declare it a fail??

d3v
02-23-2012, 03:23 PM
Ok nearly 24 hours and still 0 bytes recovered. Should I pull the plug, try something different, or what?