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dicklaw18
05-26-2008, 07:06 PM
Here's a interesting article that was in the local paper. Enjoy
http://www.syracuse.com/poststandard/stories/index.ssf?/base/business-12/121161963669860.xml&coll=1

gunslinger
05-26-2008, 08:01 PM
I see three things wrong here. (1) "They get a complete PC experience at every station," Not gonna happen, you will need something like an 8 core machine with 10-12 gigs of RAM for that to be true. There is no way you can split an old p4 system even 2 ways and each person get a "complete PC experience".

(2) It would be illegal to put OSX on it if its not a Mac so the idea that they can run OSX, Windows and Linux is wrong.

(3) Microsoft would have none of it, you would have to buy a new license for each split. Otherwise it would cost Microsoft millions.

generalj
05-26-2008, 08:21 PM
Yeah, my brother is an IT Administrator for a company and has had vendors trying to sell him this.

I think it has some good points but there is a few things that worry me.

1) If the pc crashes everyone is non productive now untill you get hopefull a backup running.

2) You do need a nice multpli processpor with multiple core system to run this.

3) I have had experience with windows systems not working right and actually getting corrupt when multiple users are logged in the same time. With te user hives and registry and shared system resources I think it messes something up.

14049752
05-26-2008, 11:33 PM
(1) "They get a complete PC experience at every station," Not gonna happen, you will need something like an 8 core machine with 10-12 gigs of RAM for that to be true. There is no way you can split an old p4 system even 2 ways and each person get a "complete PC experience".
(2) It would be illegal to put OSX on it if its not a Mac so the idea that they can run OSX, Windows and Linux is wrong.
(3) Microsoft would have none of it, you would have to buy a new license for each split. Otherwise it would cost Microsoft millions.

(1) Technically, yeah, it's going to slow down. But, realistically, look at your task monitor. How much cpu and ram are you using to do things like word processor, web browsing, etc. The product's targeted towards workstations and school machines. This is a low cost way to get people in front of a machine where the requirements aren't so high.

(2) It's not a computer system, nobody's installing Mac OS X on it. It's a PCI card and a USB device, coupled with software to run a virtual machine or use the multi user aspect of the OS.

(3) Yeah, you're correct on this part. For each user, the software has a separate "container" (meaning it's virtualized). You're only legally allowed one key per machine (virtual or otherwise)...although Microsoft gives a lot of software to schools so that may not be an issue for them. I dug through their website and found no mention of licensing Windows at all.


1) If the pc crashes everyone is non productive now untill you get hopefull a backup running.
2) You do need a nice multpli processpor with multiple core system to run this.
3) I have had experience with windows systems not working right and actually getting corrupt when multiple users are logged in the same time. With te user hives and registry and shared system resources I think it messes something up.

(1) Depends on how it crashes. If it's a hardware issue, sure, that takes everyone using the machine down. If it's software, it's all virtualized so just clone a good machine over to the corrupted one.

(2) True, but like I said above, processing power requirements are really going to depend on what you're running otherwise.

(3) This is a null issue. It's a separate installation of windows for each user, running in a virtual machine. The only thing being shared is the hardware.


The idea behind this really isn't anything new. It's basically just a clever box and software solution that makes each machine a server and a thin client of itself. Windows Server, OS X Server, and most linux distros have this built in, though it's meant to be used over a network to a thin client like a WYSE terminal or a low power (something like a 300MHz processor works!) computer.