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View Full Version : Changing Invoices for Insurance Claims?


johnnya65
04-15-2008, 12:49 AM
Gudday All,

Just a Question some may have had experience with.

A couple of weeks ago a client asked me to have a look at their server as it was behaving funny. It was infected with Viruses and Malware - Online gaming sort. They had let their virus software lapse and even though I had reminded them many times, hadn't got round to inputting their credit cards details.

I was in there for something else - but ended up spending 2 days on the 4 machines on their network and then at the clients home as the home computer was majorly infected and their current upto date virus protection (well known) didn't pick up anything.

Got protection up and running - restored the server and cleaned the computers - I hate this stuff. Gave them the invoice and wrote a summary of the why's and what's. They promptly paid the invoice and thought all done.

I just received a call to see if I could change my invoice and documentation so they could make an insurance claim. They are a valued client, but I am not wanting to open myself up to a comeback by the insurance company?

Does anyone have an experience in this - or advice, legally, professionally

thanks to all.

gadz00ks1
04-15-2008, 01:40 AM
I have never had this type of experience and I hope I don't. I would have to professionally decline that request. CYA. and move on.

MHCG
04-15-2008, 01:52 AM
If you can accomodate the customer by modifying your invoice and still remain ethical, go for it. If the customer is asking you to commit fraud, is the customer willing to employ you full time after the insurance company puts you out of business because of lawsuits?

TechnoKelvin
04-15-2008, 05:51 AM
Yeah... I get the whole fact that they are a valued customer but at the same time you're putting your ass on the line by lying. Like the poster above me said, if they plan to pay for everything you get sued for, go for it. Otherwise cover your own ass because no one else is going to.

JohnG
04-15-2008, 10:09 AM
Professionally, and ethically speaking, decline the request. No customer is worth risking your business and reputation for. Lets say you do it for them, the insurance company doesn't pay their claim, and takes no action against you. Your customer is still liable to blame you...not worth the risk either way.

Simmy
04-15-2008, 12:05 PM
I would have to professionally decline that request.

Bingo. It's not worth the risk. It could come back to bite you at any point in the future and that's the kind of thing that would keep me awake at night tbh.

jj2000
04-15-2008, 03:25 PM
gotta say i agree 100% with the above posts DONT DO IT,i was asked this very same question a while back and refused to get involved glad i said no as their insurance company wrote and asked if one of their assessors could come and see me for validation on the job, but they never turned up so i never found out what it was all about.

Jory
04-15-2008, 07:03 PM
What exactly do they want you to change it to? I can't imagine a scenario where malware removal would be covered by insurance. Plus I'm guessing the client isn't too smart because the insurance company is just going to raise their rates. They're going to end up paying more in the long run by lying.

Shenanigans like that are just bad for business.

johnnya65
04-16-2008, 05:27 AM
What exactly do they want you to change it to? I can't imagine a scenario where malware removal would be covered by insurance. Plus I'm guessing the client isn't too smart because the insurance company is just going to raise their rates. They're going to end up paying more in the long run by lying.

They are wanting me to remove the reason for the infection - database out of date because they hadn't renewed their registration - and just say it was "inadequate" and to take out that I had warned them about using the server for general web surfing previously. Sounds like I would be leaving myself way to open. They don't deserve to be able to claim - but I don't know the extent of their cover.

Thanks for the input

MHCG
04-16-2008, 06:17 AM
Personally, I wouldn't have put that on their invoice in the first place. I would have just said the virus scanner was out of date. It's not your responsibility to place blame, unless they voided your warranty because of their failure to follow through.

Personally, knowing what you've said now, I'd probably accomodate them because they're not asking you to lie. I'd tell them I'd change it, but I'd also inform them that if the insurance adjuster calls asking why the virus scanner was out of date, you have to let them know it was because their subscription didn't get renewed. You don't need to say why or who was responsible for this failure because honestly, you weren't there when they decided not to renew their subscription. You only know that their subscription lapsed.

Perhaps it's a fine line, but you'd accommodate the customer and still be able to sleep at night.

Bryce W
04-16-2008, 07:14 AM
What did they want you to change it to exactly?
Ive done one insurance job before. Their computers power supply blew up because of nearby roadworks (its happened to heaps of people in the area). I replaced the power supply, their paid and I gave them an invoice. The only difference from my normal one was I wrote "Replaced power supply. Was most likely damaged during recent power surge".

A few weeks later the insurance company asked me what happened to the computer. I said that "the power supply had died. It occasionally happens when power surges occur." They said thank you and that was the last I heard of it.

johnnya65
04-18-2008, 12:12 PM
Thanks everyone,

I found the views helpful in coming to a decision. I don't think it's unreasonable to adjust the invoice to basically state the facts, now that I know they are wanting to make a claim. I put extra information on the original invoice just to cover my butt with kinda like "I told you so".

It's not my job to decide what constitutes a worthwhile claim in this instance - it's all documented.

Thanks everyone.

PC ZONE
04-28-2008, 08:16 AM
Personally, I wouldn't have put that on their invoice in the first place. I would have just said the virus scanner was out of date. It's not your responsibility to place blame, unless they voided your warranty because of their failure to follow through.

Personally, knowing what you've said now, I'd probably accomodate them because they're not asking you to lie. I'd tell them I'd change it, but I'd also inform them that if the insurance adjuster calls asking why the virus scanner was out of date, you have to let them know it was because their subscription didn't get renewed. You don't need to say why or who was responsible for this failure because honestly, you weren't there when they decided not to renew their subscription. You only know that their subscription lapsed.

Perhaps it's a fine line, but you'd accommodate the customer and still be able to sleep at night.

I'm with MHCG on this one and i get to look at dodgy insurance claims from time to time in that i would not have placed blame but just stated simple facts, i've got a dell server at the moment the insurance company won't tell us what the claim is for but want us to tell them whats happened as if it was brought into us for repair.
A tip here for honest technicians is to stay honest treat all jobs as though another tech will evaulate your repair/diagnosis (Some Insurance Companies do check up) Document all work done and incase of misdiagnosis at least have a valid reason as to how you came to the final conclusion of job.

I have seen blown PSU's and modems (legit) through to cut CPU fan wires, computers that boot without any issues e.t.c all after another computer shop has looked at the computer for repair/replacement it's also amazing how many people are adamant that their claims are legit and can be backed up by a computer shop but on hard evidence it all changes:eek:

i2omani
04-28-2008, 04:07 PM
I would ask them to write you a letter with their request ,stamped and mailed to your address that way in case something went wrong you will have something in your hand to show it.

that beeing provided , you made you client happy and at the same time you didn't do anything have to do with fraud

Thats my 2 cents