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generalj
04-15-2008, 12:32 AM
USB Flash vs USB external Hard Drive

I was just wondering which one would be better for a backing up customer data, nothing major, but like backing up their profiles before a re installation, say anywhere from a few MB of data to a few gigs of data.

Which one would be faster doing this operation.

14049752
04-15-2008, 12:36 AM
If you plan to use it on-site, I'd go with an external hard drive. Flash drives are nice, and you can get them at a good price, lately....but you should be prepared to back up a significant amount of data, just in case. Something like a 200gb hard drive or something is what I would go with. It might seem like overkill, but at least with that you know you probably won't run out of space.

generalj
04-15-2008, 01:03 AM
Well, I have been researching, there is eSata, firewire, and of course USB external hard drives. Trying to find the best one now is another question.

In terms of speeds, it looks like this

eSata > Firewire > USB

but the question that has remained to be fully explained and answered with some sort of good testing benchmarking is...

Is a External drive that has multiple ports, such as a external drive with both firewire and USB ports slower then if it was only firewire since it has to have a bridge to convert the connections.

So I want a fast drive so I am not waiting a long time on files to copy. I mean even 5 mins of more wait time can be a pain for me.

So I like firewire, but I know a lot of customers I would work on may not have firewire but would have USB. So I was thinking of getting a Firewire/USB external drive, but as the questions above is this type of drive actually slower then just a plain firewire one?

And if it is slower because of the bridging of the two connections is a USB only going to be faster.

Lol

syst3merror
04-15-2008, 01:45 AM
what I carry might be considered "overkill" but I carry 10 blank cdrs, 10 blank dvd-rs, 5 cd-rws, 5 dvd-rws, a 12 gig flash databank, a 120 gig 2.5" external hard drive, and a 500 gig 3.5" external hard drive.

I would say I've used the 120 gig external and the 12 gig flash more than anything.

Everything I use is USB 1.0 or 2.0. I don't use anything firewire because not a lot of people have it.

Jory
04-15-2008, 02:20 AM
I use a 40GB 2.5" laptop drive in an enclosure. A HD is going to be much faster for copying a large group of small files. The write speeds on flash drives are not good in that scenario.

You shouldn't notice a difference in speed between a firewire only drive and one with USB also. Both connections are going to be soldered to the board which is transferring data faster that what it's going across the cable. It probably wouldn't hurt to find some benchmarks though if you're that concerned about a few seconds.

MHCG
04-15-2008, 02:55 AM
I carry a 2gb flash, 160gb usb harddrive, a couple CDs and a couple DVDs.

JohnG
04-15-2008, 11:46 AM
As far as speed goes, I've found flash drives to be on par with external drives, sometimes faster depending on the system I am working on. The exception being eSATA...I carry 2 4gb flash drives, 1 60gb 2.5 external hd, 10 dvd+/-r to use with an external burner. I give the customer the option of having a copy of their data for future use, hopefully giving myself the opportunity to upcharge. ;)

gunslinger
04-15-2008, 01:28 PM
4-5 floopy disks ( hey, you never know )
2-3 CD-RWs
2-3 DVDs
Portable 80gig HDD and two flash drives

I have never needed more than this.

Blues
04-15-2008, 03:29 PM
Just stick to USB as most PCs will have this if they don't have it your next best bet would be a CD-RW drive and missing that then you need to take it to your shop for a backup. I always have a flash drive but I would say carry a decent size 2.5" external drive.

geekhelp4u
04-15-2008, 03:49 PM
i usually go to tiger direct and buy 2.5 a western digital 2.5 inch 160 GB USB 2 drive for around $95! when I get on site, and the client sees how useful this device is, ill turn around and charge him $135 - $150 dollars for his backup! With this, I allow him to keep the drive for his own future and personal use! This way I am not making money off the drive, getting paid a few extra bucks for a system backup, and the client really seems to get a lot more out of my service! For personal use, I buy the external kits, and slap my old 2.5 drives in them. Also, I have 4 8 GB sanDisk flash sticks that I picked up at radio shack on sale for $20 a piece! CDr and DVDrs again are a great cheap way of allowing the customer to have a copy of his backup! I always at least do this! The extra mile you go for the customer is always return business. I understand time is an issue, but if you are pressed for time, save the data to the external. When you get home, and have free time, burn the data to dvd or cd. Then send the dvd / cd to them by media mail with a nice thank you for your business card/note. This way you seem more personal and willing to go the extra mile to help out!

camp.cool007
01-02-2009, 03:50 AM
You should probably take an external hard drive. Flash drives are only meant for backing up a little data. (But they have been making ones with 16 gigs). Your hard drive will suffice for multipule backups and can store much more data.

reesk92
02-03-2009, 07:51 PM
what I carry might be considered "overkill" but I carry 10 blank cdrs, 10 blank dvd-rs, 5 cd-rws, 5 dvd-rws, a 12 gig flash databank, a 120 gig 2.5" external hard drive, and a 500 gig 3.5" external hard drive.

I would say I've used the 120 gig external and the 12 gig flash more than anything.

Everything I use is USB 1.0 or 2.0. I don't use anything firewire because not a lot of people have it.


i wouldnt call that overkill i do the same because i prefer to have the right media for the size of date i have
mini cd-r for small backup jobs around 200mb
regular cd-rs for ont time only backups of up to 700mb i carry 50 in a cd ewallet
cd-rw for recuring backups of upto 700mb now this is where the difference is i DO NOT use the spindle type because i belive for recuring or longterm backups i prefer to have a sealed disk that free from contaminents untill use ive even been known to place a tape seal back tove the case to ensure the cleanliness of the disk

dvdr one time off 4.7 gigs
dvdrw again sealed for recuring

iomega zip diusks for the odd volumes like 250mb

and for extremeley short lifespan backups such as those you take as a precaution before carrying out invasive maintenece i use flashdrives and harddrives


im also looking into supplying my clients with a backup service where there alocated a physical hdd to the size of their requirements mirroring or plain backing up their files then storing their backup hdd in a data vault at a secure location i would probably charge initial setup what ever the drive costs plus a 15 work fee then depending on the backup schedule anything from 10 to 50 pound for backups thereafter with 50 being big backup jobs weekley i could probably do better having some advance fileserver that would rade mirror the customers drive once inserted into the array but hey im not quite rolling in it yet did i mention the dpa (data protection act) would be a pain in the ass as well lol

usacvlr
02-03-2009, 08:43 PM
I have found that an external usb hard drive whether it has firewire added or not is significantly faster than a thumb drive ESPECIALLY if you are replacing files on the thumbdrive with existing files,, then the thumbs grind to a slow crawl. You can get 64 giggers now though which is nice.

anthony@bnacomputers.com
02-03-2009, 08:51 PM
I always carry with me
- 4-5 dvds
- 2 cds
- my laptop 320 gig harddrive
- maxtor 320 gig external harddrive
- pc to pc transfer cable
- thumbdrives

stevenamills
02-03-2009, 09:00 PM
I saw a 64 Gig flash drive for $70 bucks today - Sheesh!

I use a 32 most of the time for unimportant stuff, but rely on an external HD for backup, as I don't have the resources to recover from a corrupted flash drive. The HD is more "recoverable". I have a 1 TB WD that I generally use.

bboy131
02-06-2009, 04:24 AM
I would use the external hard drive. You could keep track of multiple customers and store more data. Plus the hard drives can be SATA which will be faster than a thumb drive.

anthony@bnacomputers.com
02-12-2009, 05:06 AM
we should put a survey on this thread :) to see what everyone likes to use more :D

Tiddle
02-12-2009, 01:27 PM
i usually go to tiger direct and buy 2.5 a western digital 2.5 inch 160 GB USB 2 drive for around $95! when I get on site, and the client sees how useful this device is, ill turn around and charge him $135 - $150 dollars for his backup! With this, I allow him to keep the drive for his own future and personal use! This way I am not making money off the drive, getting paid a few extra bucks for a system backup, and the client really seems to get a lot more out of my service! For personal use, I buy the external kits, and slap my old 2.5 drives in them. Also, I have 4 8 GB sanDisk flash sticks that I picked up at radio shack on sale for $20 a piece! CDr and DVDrs again are a great cheap way of allowing the customer to have a copy of his backup! I always at least do this! The extra mile you go for the customer is always return business. I understand time is an issue, but if you are pressed for time, save the data to the external. When you get home, and have free time, burn the data to dvd or cd. Then send the dvd / cd to them by media mail with a nice thank you for your business card/note. This way you seem more personal and willing to go the extra mile to help out!

Okay, so you buy the drives then resell them to the customer with their data on them?

Cost of Drive + Work of Saving data = your Profit

Or did i read this wrong bro?

camp.cool007
02-17-2009, 09:32 PM
Flash Drives aren't made for backing up huge amounts of data. In your case, I'd use a External Hard Drive for big stuff, and the flash drive for small stuff.

SThompson86
02-27-2010, 11:18 PM
I was considering getting a 500GB Passport or Free Agent. Do you guys think 500 is overkill? and yes, saving some money would be nice, But I do not want to ever not ever have enough space not to back up someones image.

Thanks in advanced.

kagman
02-27-2010, 11:22 PM
I carry around with me several usb drives, and a 320gb external 2.5in drive. and also so memory card with me...

SThompson86
02-27-2010, 11:52 PM
I carry around with me several usb drives, and a 320gb external 2.5in drive. and also so memory card with me...

Does the 320 seem sufficient for your needs?

I was thinking about going with just a 320 because like you I have serveral jump drives. Thanks for the advice.

ell
02-28-2010, 12:35 AM
i usually go to tiger direct and buy 2.5 a western digital 2.5 inch 160 GB USB 2 drive for around $95! when I get on site, and the client sees how useful this device is, ill turn around and charge him $135 - $150 dollars for his backup! With this, I allow him to keep the drive for his own future and personal use! This way I am not making money off the drive, getting paid a few extra bucks for a system backup, and the client really seems to get a lot more out of my service! For personal use, I buy the external kits, and slap my old 2.5 drives in them. Also, I have 4 8 GB sanDisk flash sticks that I picked up at radio shack on sale for $20 a piece! CDr and DVDrs again are a great cheap way of allowing the customer to have a copy of his backup! I always at least do this! The extra mile you go for the customer is always return business. I understand time is an issue, but if you are pressed for time, save the data to the external. When you get home, and have free time, burn the data to dvd or cd. Then send the dvd / cd to them by media mail with a nice thank you for your business card/note. This way you seem more personal and willing to go the extra mile to help out!

excellent ideas! bet you get lots of referrals.

Cambridge PC Support
02-28-2010, 07:33 AM
what Ell just said

but, I've never been happy about sending people's data thru the mail unless it's encrypted

e2346437
02-28-2010, 09:33 AM
Does the 320 seem sufficient for your needs?

I was thinking about going with just a 320 because like you I have serveral jump drives. Thanks for the advice.

Heck no, 320 isn't enough. I've had an Iomega eGo 250 for a year and a half and it's full. I have just enough room to xcopy a customers' old PC so that I can move their data to a new PC.

Get a 500.

Eric

Cambridge PC Support
02-28-2010, 09:38 AM
if there's too much data I couldn't really justify charging to sit there twiddling my thumbs for an hour waiting for hundreds of gigs of data to be squirted thru a USB port

in that case I'd be taking it away to do it