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Appletax
11-30-2010, 06:18 AM
http://www.w3schools.com/

iptech
11-30-2010, 07:47 AM
Lesson one: Do not overuse smileys.

Appletax
11-30-2010, 07:48 AM
Lesson one: Do not overuse smileys.

Question one: why do you disapprove of the eek smilies? :eek:

iptech
11-30-2010, 08:03 AM
Question one: why do you disapprove of the eek smilies? :eek:
I'm viewing this from my netbook so I had to scroll through four pages of smiley spam before I got to the bottom of your post which in the end consisted solely of a single url posted in triplicate.

Appletax
11-30-2010, 08:51 AM
http://img802.imageshack.us/img802/4420/capturefz.th.png (http://img802.imageshack.us/i/capturefz.png/)

Winchester Computer Care
11-30-2010, 05:00 PM
Lesson one: Do not overuse smileys.

I agree...I thought this site was supposed to be for professionals.

Appletax
11-30-2010, 05:02 PM
I agree...I thought this site was supposed to be for professionals.

A bunch of smilies doesn't make a person unprofessional.
I'm just being silly. ;):p

tankman1989
12-29-2010, 01:04 AM
http://www.w3schools.com/

I thought I would revive this thread since there wasn't much discussion related to the OP. I came across this site a couple years back and it looks like it has improved greatly since then!

I want to know if anyone knows of any down sides to using this site to learn web programming. I am starting out basically from scratch, although I do know some minimal HTML and VB (non web though).

I'm not sure which languages I should learn and where to start. Any suggestions? Thanks

Vicenarian
12-29-2010, 03:14 AM
I thought I would revive this thread since there wasn't much discussion related to the OP. I came across this site a couple years back and it looks like it has improved greatly since then!

I want to know if anyone knows of any down sides to using this site to learn web programming. I am starting out basically from scratch, although I do know some minimal HTML and VB (non web though).

I'm not sure which languages I should learn and where to start. Any suggestions? Thanks

I don't know a whole lot about web design, but I do a bit as a hobby. PHP and Javascript are good to know, from what I have read online. It's also good to know how to configure/work with stuff like Joomla/Wordpress/etc.

jvcomputerservice
12-29-2010, 03:43 AM
I'm also learning web programming. This is my plan for the next months; I already know HTML and XHTML and i think I now have all the basics of CSS and a little bit more.

next I will start JavaScript then I will work on php. (i have read in many forums that this the way to do it. html --> CSS -->javascript --> PHP.

I would like to offer web design in the near future to get some extra income and also because I really enjoy doing that.

I read that Joomla was really easy to update and design. And I think is true (already installed on my server) but you will need CSS knowledge in order to work with joomla and customize it according to your clients need. that's why I started studying CSS.


and by the way http://www.w3schools.com/ is a great place to start but you are gonna have to get a book later on.

JosephLeo
12-29-2010, 04:29 AM
I was practicing as a web designer during the beginning of the "web 2.0" era and picked up a few tidbits of information along the way. I won't say that I'm professional but I will say I know more than the average bear.

First and foremost I think you might know this already (or maybe not) but HTML5 and CSS3 is all the rage and is appearing all over the web one site at a time. It seems video websites are the largest of the early adopters of the new craze due to mobile devices and the limitations of processing power and accessibility with the flash platform. (namely, Apple and their iPads, pods and phones)

Next, I should also tell you that the web isn't just HTML, CSS, JavaScript and PHP. No, it's much more than that. We also have XML, Databases (SQL-based mostly as far as I'm aware) and various "techniques" using a combination of the above scripting and programming languages. You also have to worry about search engine optimization, the document object model, common browser rending bugs (especially with internet explorer) and that there are standards in place used by almost all professional web designers which were developed (and listed) by the World Wide Web Consortium (w3c.org) a.k.a. the W3C.

You also must note the fact that the web is currently going through a paradigm shift. We are shifting from "the social web" (Web 2.0) to "the semantic web" (Web 3.0) which is where everything has a place, context and is properly organized...in other words, the web is turning into search engine crack.

Finally, you might want to know that the web isn't programmed only in PHP, in fact some of the biggest websites avoid it all together as it doesn't scale efficiently. Ruby on Rails is used by Twitter and LinkdIn. Python is used by Google and YouTube. However, PHP is in fact used by big websites. The biggest? Facebook.

Oh, wait, that wasn't the final note. Choose your CMS early on. Over the years I've tried dozens (if not over a hundred) CMS's and I've primarily focused on three of them. Wordpress, Drupal and Joomla.
Wordpress by far is the easiest of them all, but is geared towards blogging websites. Drupal by far is the hardest, but the most powerful once you learn how to use it right (MTV and The official U.S. white house website run it) and Joomla, well it's the perfect combo of ease of use and extensibility.
Personally, I used Drupal. Always have, but soon will be looking at something new as I'm going to switch to python soon.

Ouch, and wait there is more. Frameworks...frameworks.
CSS and JavaScript are known for having their frameworks. For CSS I recommend the yahoo YUI library and Blueprint. For JavaScript I recommend (one or the other, never both) jQuery or mootools. and last but not least, always remember that IE6 and 7 are still widely used, and still horrible to work with. So expect frequent headaches.

AdamsAPlus
12-29-2010, 05:06 PM
html --> CSS -->javascript --> PHP.


I know some html and some CSS also from some classes I took in college. My plan is to net learn some Flash before Java. I was told (by a guy that does a lot of web hosting and web design) that Flash is easier to learn than Java and may help you understand Java.

I haven't taken any courses on either yet so I can't vouch.