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Martyn
10-01-2010, 09:57 AM
I didn't want to hijack the A+ thread so I thought i would start a new one :p

I haven't bothered with exam certifications since I did my ccna back in 2000. That expired in 2003. Reading the thread about A+ got me thinking about it and someone posted an test exam thread so I took the exam and passed with 81% first go :) Anyway I started reading about the exam and(you may or may not know about this) found that Network+ certification is for life providing you have it before Jan 2011 after that it needs recertifying every three years. This also applies to A+ & Security+. Soo you may see last minute rush to take exams.Apologies if it has been posted before, I haven't seen it in the time I have been a member.

Shall I take it or not?:)

Read more here.

http://www.comptia.org/certifications/listed/renewal.aspx

Cadishead Computers
10-01-2010, 10:37 AM
This is my own view on this Martyn. If you are working on soho clients, and home clients, and to a certain extent sml bus clients, then no, I wouldn't go for this, nor any other cert. All they seem to care about, is that you can do the job.

If you were in the marketplace, looking for a full time IT job, then, yes I would go for them, as it would add to your credibility, your CV etc.

The only good thing I can see from being A+,N+ cert'd, is on ads. Yellow pages etc, by having the logo on your ad, clients can see that you care about your work, and value the honesty so to speak.

In saying that, I have recently started adding 2 other logo's. One for the FSB, and the MCP. Being a member of the FSB now for a couple of years, I have found their advice invaluable. I have had a few calls off local businesses, who have seen the FSB logo, as they are members of it too.

Re the Security+, I am thinking of looking into the course, not to take the exam, but to see whats actually involved, and if it will add anything to my business.

I took a A+ course, around 6 years ago, passed the coursework, and mock exam with flying colours, but haven't actually taken the comptiia exam.

I also took the N+ course at the same time, but then found it really difficult, and didn't pursue it further. I stopped at the 4th module. Fast forward to today, and with using networks on a daily basis, as part of 'our' setup, its like everything, it all comes back to you, and if needed I probably could pick it up, and complete the course, and do the exams, but again I don't think its needed for our clients. IE those, who have a couple of desktops, and a laptop, and want them all networked together..

Just my 2p :)

CD Computer Services
10-01-2010, 12:49 PM
The only problem I have with CompTIA A+ exam is that rote learners excel at it.You need hands-on training to make it useful.A+ certification is basic;however,it's useful for computer technicians.

TLE
10-01-2010, 01:19 PM
I took the A+ back in May or June, I couldn't believe how incredibly basic and easy it was. It doesn't prove anything other than basic knowledge. I managed to get 100% in both exams. It still looks good to have on your website though, although to be fair, most people here in the UK don't know what CompTia is, or in fact have ever heard of it. I plan to sit the Network+ before the end of the year if time allows, as I have just taken 70-680, and am about to sit 70-685(not looking forward too).

I say go for it, if it gives you somthing over your competition.:D

lgtechcomputers
10-01-2010, 03:19 PM
This is my own view on this Martyn. If you are working on soho clients, and home clients, and to a certain extent sml bus clients, then no, I wouldn't go for this, nor any other cert. All they seem to care about, is that you can do the job.

If you were in the marketplace, looking for a full time IT job, then, yes I would go for them, as it would add to your credibility, your CV etc.

The only good thing I can see from being A+,N+ cert'd, is on ads. Yellow pages etc, by having the logo on your ad, clients can see that you care about your work, and value the honesty so to speak.

In saying that, I have recently started adding 2 other logo's. One for the FSB, and the MCP. Being a member of the FSB now for a couple of years, I have found their advice invaluable. I have had a few calls off local businesses, who have seen the FSB logo, as they are members of it too.

Re the Security+, I am thinking of looking into the course, not to take the exam, but to see whats actually involved, and if it will add anything to my business.

I took a A+ course, around 6 years ago, passed the coursework, and mock exam with flying colours, but haven't actually taken the comptiia exam.

I also took the N+ course at the same time, but then found it really difficult, and didn't pursue it further. I stopped at the 4th module. Fast forward to today, and with using networks on a daily basis, as part of 'our' setup, its like everything, it all comes back to you, and if needed I probably could pick it up, and complete the course, and do the exams, but again I don't think its needed for our clients. IE those, who have a couple of desktops, and a laptop, and want them all networked together..

Just my 2p :)

Forgive my ignorance but what does the FSB stand for? I am sure it is not Front Side Bus. or is it Fortune Small business? :)

4ycr
10-01-2010, 03:28 PM
@Cadishead Computers glad you mentioned the FSB as I just joined today. I have been a member of the local chamber of commerce but not got much out of it as they have been teaming up with groups too far away for me.

I just need to add it to my website now.

I currently show my MCSA, My Cisco select partner and ACRBO logos encase they help me stand out from anyone local.

A few years ago I got hold of a A+ book but it went on about ISA slots and at the time I was building servers for SUN and I was lucky to even see a standard PCI slot so I thought it was too outdated to be of any use. So I gave up, is it still the same or have they updated it?

Cadishead Computers
10-01-2010, 05:55 PM
Forgive my ignorance but what does the FSB stand for? I am sure it is not Front Side Bus. or is it Fortune Small business? :)

Its the Federation of Small Businesses.

A group of companies, situated around the country, decided to set up together, to help, and aid other small companies, with what ever issues they have.

It doesnt matter, if its help with the Tax man, with a full investigation, or Human Resource issues, and everything else inbetween. They help out, and once you have paid your membership fee, everything else is foc.

They also offer things, like help with free banking, health insurance..

Cadishead Computers
10-01-2010, 05:59 PM
A few years ago I got hold of a A+ book but it went on about ISA slots and at the time I was building servers for SUN and I was lucky to even see a standard PCI slot so I thought it was too outdated to be of any use. So I gave up, is it still the same or have they updated it?

When I was studying it, it was everything from ISA slots upwards. On the software side of things of paramount importance was win 2k. You had to learn everything from DOS upto WIN ME. Win 2k, was the in thing - hence why everyone had to learn it. At the end of the course was a small booklet on XP.

ps, nice one on the FSB. I've been a member now for 3 years.

lgtechcomputers
10-01-2010, 06:49 PM
Its the Federation of Small Businesses.

A group of companies, situated around the country, decided to set up together, to help, and aid other small companies, with what ever issues they have.

It doesnt matter, if its help with the Tax man, with a full investigation, or Human Resource issues, and everything else inbetween. They help out, and once you have paid your membership fee, everything else is foc.

They also offer things, like help with free banking, health insurance..

Thanks for the clarification. I will need to look into it.

Cadishead Computers
10-01-2010, 06:54 PM
Thanks for the clarification. I will need to look into it.

No worries LG, but unless im mistaken, they only deal with UK companies. Or companies based in the UK.

Cybjun
10-01-2010, 08:01 PM
My problem with certificates boils down to how they are issued. No one verifies the person can apply the knowledge covered in the courses to the real world. (same problem I have with schools). I get people coming in all the time looking for a job with A+, CCNA, and Microsoft certs. yet most of them can't tell me how to get to device manager in windows or what DNS applies too let alone what it stands for. experience over certificates anyday for me

lgtechcomputers
10-01-2010, 08:11 PM
Yeah I noticed however I did find the US version. Scotland also has one.

For US - http://www.usfsb.com/
http://www.fsb.org.uk/

Anyway I will explore the US version.

Thanks again.

K007
10-01-2010, 08:16 PM
My problem with certificates boils down to how they are issued. No one verifies the person can apply the knowledge covered in the courses to the real world. (same problem I have with schools). I get people coming in all the time looking for a job with A+, CCNA, and Microsoft certs. yet most of them can't tell me how to get to device manager in windows or what DNS applies too let alone what it stands for. experience over certificates anyday for me

Am I going nuts, or you just don't have a CISCO certification, neither heard anyone who actually has talking about it?
For your information, the CISCO certifications have lab tests.
If you don't do your hands-on training, there is no hope in hell you'll pass it.

If you got your CCIE , and you go for a job you surely got it.
After you got the job, when your colleagues find out about it, they look at you like you were a time traveller dropped in our time from the future.
There is no greater reward, both personal and professional than that.

Edit:
If at your interview you ask your wannabe employees what the DNS stands for, you will hire the wrong person most likely. That definition has nothing to do with experience.
As for what DNS applies to, even an MCP can tell you that, but not an A+ (unless he's learned it from somewhere else).

Martyn
10-01-2010, 08:25 PM
I don't think anyone on here is discrediting certifications, you have to study for them to pass. I passed two different online tests today for Comptia Network + having not studied at all for that exam but with the knowledge I got from studying MCSE and CCNA many years ago. Yes they are multiple answer questions in the main but your not going to guess your way to a pass. :)

The issue here is how far can you get with employment having the certs.

K007
10-01-2010, 08:30 PM
I don't think anyone on here is discrediting certifications, you have to study for them to pass. I passed two different online tests today for Comptia Network + having not studied at all for that exam but with the knowledge I got from studying MCSE and CCNA many years ago. Yes they are multiple answer questions in the main but your not going to guess your way to a pass. :)

The issue here is how far can you get with employment having the certs.

Exactly Martyn.
Spot on.
Why waste your time studying for the wrong certification unless you're a dummy?
If someone believes A+ has a lot to offer (as in knowledge), then I would not leave my computer with that person for repair.

Cybjun
10-01-2010, 10:33 PM
Am I going nuts, or you just don't have a CISCO certification, neither heard anyone who actually has talking about it?
For your information, the CISCO certifications have lab tests.
If you don't do your hands-on training, there is no hope in hell you'll pass it.

If you got your CCIE , and you go for a job you surely got it.
After you got the job, when your colleagues find out about it, they look at you like you were a time traveller dropped in our time from the future.
There is no greater reward, both personal and professional than that.

Edit:
If at your interview you ask your wannabe employees what the DNS stands for, you will hire the wrong person most likely. That definition has nothing to do with experience.
As for what DNS applies to, even an MCP can tell you that, but not an A+ (unless he's learned it from somewhere else).

I stand corrected on the cisco lab test. However I think I covered my statement with when I said "most" and not all. And doing lab test doesnt necessarily prepare you what you will experence in most business environment most lab test are really designed to see if you can apply what you had just covered. I think a better evaluation of skills when issuing a certificate would be to have someone evaluate your work periodically over the life of the certificate. I understand thats not likely but without it they dont have much value to me other then saying "yes, this person studied and we checked"

And what I was as far as what I said about DNS, it was an example of a technicial question that most techs could answer, but I have had numerous walkins asking for a job, claiming they had A+ and MSDT certificates yet they couldn't tell me what DNS does let alone what D.N.S stands for. Most can't even tell me how to get to Device Manager in windows (of which an acceptable answer was go to control panel and select system) :rolleyes:

By no means are these EXAMPLES of questions I asked the extent of my interview. They are just the start. if the applicant can not answer correctly I finish my interview fast and pass the resume to the rejected folder and move on. I tend to prefer experience over certificates.