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Computer Brainiacs
07-28-2010, 07:19 PM
Hey guys,

Im currently installing sever 2008 to a VM because I need to learn servers and how they are setup etc.. I was wondering what would be a good first step to do after server 2008 is installed. I would like to learn how to setup print server, AD and domain, dns/dhcp server etc.. Any good tutorials maybe? Thanks guy..

( this is going to be done on a home network )

ATTech
07-28-2010, 07:25 PM
Microsoft has made server 2008 pretty idiot proof. Just follow whatever pops up on the screen.

Computer Brainiacs
07-28-2010, 07:54 PM
...thanks, i tried. I dont understand how to setup the DNS DHCP etc.. IPs and subnets shut my brain down

onetech4all
07-28-2010, 08:07 PM
I am sure it's not quite idiot proof, you still need to know what exactly you're doing! It's not easy learning what an MCSE knows!
I would say buy the books on it and take on chapter at a time with hands on, in time you can be pretty good at it.

vdub12
07-28-2010, 08:46 PM
I started with 2k server on an old Cyrix and today I use a win2k3 server on a VM.

There not that hard, I use it as my webserver and with a little trial and error I got it set up. 2k3 is almost exactly like 2k but I have not tried 2k8 yet.

I may give it a try soon to see what its like. Just make sure your VM's NIC is set to bridge and not NAT. That would get you no where fast.

4ycr
07-28-2010, 09:26 PM
sbs 2008 is idiot proof as they do have a console that you click on and go through wizards to set things up. I have not used standard 2008 yet.

I have not look for videos but have you tried getting a book and going through it step by step.

I have found it's not the setting up but the problem solving that's the problem. I am new to servers as well and got the Microsoft training kit for the sbs 2008 server

onetech4all
07-28-2010, 09:50 PM
I am sure you can click Next and Next, but if you don't know what the options and features are for, you will spend more time troubleshooting and fixing what you did, than configuring.

4ycr
07-28-2010, 10:01 PM
That is why I got the book, so I knew what it was doing. I also have an MCSA + messaging so I know about DNS and DHCP but I have found getting a good book and going through it in a logical sequence better.

ATTech
07-28-2010, 10:29 PM
I am sure you can click Next and Next, but if you don't know what the options and features are for, you will spend more time troubleshooting and fixing what you did, than configuring.

I was under the impression that he know how AD/DNS/DHCP, etc. worked, and that he was just needing to know his way around server 2008. My mistake.

@OP:
You would be better off buying a book/watching videos/taking a class to learn about the ins and outs of these services that servers provide before setting it up in a production environment. Either that or just plug away at it, googling whatever doesn't make sense to you.

vdub12
07-29-2010, 12:22 AM
I am sure you can click Next and Next, but if you don't know what the options and features are for, you will spend more time troubleshooting and fixing what you did, than configuring.

You do need a basic understanding of servers but as long as you have that any OS can be figured out.

I have no formal training setting up servers but I have set up many over the years. Both Windows and Linux. In configurations including basic file servers, domain controllers, web servers, etc.etc.

Some times the best way to figure it out is to troubleshoot. It is the best form of experience.

MobileTechie
07-29-2010, 09:26 AM
Do the MCP for 2008 Admin and the one for network infrastructure. You'll learn the official MS way of administering a system and a very solid course in networking, dns, subnets etc.

I did this for 2003 and it's proven to be very handy.

onetech4all
07-29-2010, 02:17 PM
Some times the best way to figure it out is to troubleshoot. It is the best form of experience. - well said.

Even if you come from a Linux environment or from Windows NT, I think, and you understood DNS, DHCP and other important services, you can still do a pretty good job at troubleshooting a Windows 2003/2008.

vdub12
07-30-2010, 05:18 AM
- well said.

Even if you come from a Linux environment or from Windows NT, I think, and you understood DNS, DHCP and other important services, you can still do a pretty good job at troubleshooting a Windows 2003/2008.

I agree.

As long as you know the basics of networking I think the OS is just the tool to get you there.

And if you are use to Linux servers you will fly though a Windows server, lol.

Psychoticus
07-31-2010, 02:01 PM
a good way to learn is to use the Microsoft Virtual Labs (http://www.microsoft.com/events/vlabs/default.mspx)

impressivepcdoctors
08-04-2010, 01:20 PM
this is a pretty good site for tutorial videos.

can be costly

http://www.cbtnuggets.com/