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View Full Version : ADVICE!!! For anyone starting a career in IT support


LiamemzUK
01-28-2008, 03:41 PM
Hi there, im Liam, 23, from the UK. Ive just started studying for my A+ exam and am pretty new to the technical side of IT, but i know its what i want to do and what interests me. Basically i was just wondering if anybody has any advice as i know that experience is probably the most important thing in this industry. As i said, my knowledge isn't great at the moment so any line you can throw me i'd greatfully grab. Cheers

rsavoia
01-31-2008, 05:37 PM
Hi there, im Liam, 23, from the UK. Ive just started studying for my A+ exam and am pretty new to the technical side of IT, but i know its what i want to do and what interests me. Basically i was just wondering if anybody has any advice as i know that experience is probably the most important thing in this industry. As i said, my knowledge isn't great at the moment so any line you can throw me i'd greatfully grab. Cheers

Hi Liam,

The IT industry has become so broad and ever expanding that the hardware side is now just a part of it. The A+ certification is a good start. Other industry and vendor specific certifications help. The best advice I can think of at the moment is to keep studying, find a local shop or company where you can intern and learn as much as you can from those who mentor you. Don't attempt to do it on your own until you spend some time doing it for someone else. Don't try to be a Macgyver and do everything. Find a niche you like and are comfortable with that has potential for growth and focus on that.

The days of the do-it-all Macgyvertech are numbered. One can spend a lifetime learning everything about everything and still not know everything. Focus on a specific area of IT and learn as much as possible about that. Be an expert who specializes and collaborate on the rest. It will be easier and more profitable in the long run.

Good Luck!

Rick

mityay
02-01-2008, 05:52 PM
Great advice Rsavoia! Niche is important since it's impossible to know everything unless you are some kind of hacker who hasn't seen a light of day in years.
My question is why nobody ever suggests getting a Bachelor's degree in IT? I'm a little frusturated about this topic. Most people who I know working in IT have some kind of higher education.

Nathan H
02-02-2008, 09:51 AM
Great advice Rsavoia! Niche is important since it's impossible to know everything unless you are some kind of hacker who hasn't seen a light of day in years.
My question is why nobody ever suggests getting a Bachelor's degree in IT? I'm a little frusturated about this topic. Most people who I know working in IT have some kind of higher education.

Hi ,mityay

Qualifications are goo as long as you plan on being an employee.

If you setting up your own Computer repair business (For example)
Qualification don't mean much (as far as our customers go anyway) most of them couldn't tell a CCIE form an A+.

Generally from my own experience having a good basic understanding of most things and a futher indepth knowledge ina particual field (for me its excellent customer service, there are so many it repair guys near me with bad reps)

and the most IMPORTANTLY and i can not stress this enough is KNOWING WHERE TO TURN WHEN YOU DONT KNOW SOMETHING, for example the guys and girls on this site have a wealth of knowledge, and thers always google, i also have a good collection of books both hard back and E-Books, which i have stored on few DVD's & take with me as a back up if i need them.

cmonova
02-03-2008, 07:22 PM
Hi ,mityay

Qualifications are goo as long as you plan on being an employee.

If you setting up your own Computer repair business (For example)
Qualification don't mean much (as far as our customers go anyway) most of them couldn't tell a CCIE form an A+.

Generally from my own experience having a good basic understanding of most things and a futher indepth knowledge ina particual field (for me its excellent customer service, there are so many it repair guys near me with bad reps)


The A+ is a good start and maybe a Microsoft test to get your MCP cert. No matter if you are an employee or own your own business certs are not going to hurt you. More importantly it will set you apart from the others. Being in business years I can agree that most customers do not know the difference if you have one cert or another.

But, you will run across businesses that do know what certs are (or at least they think so) and they will ask if you have them.

If you are just starting out then you might as well squeeze them in when you can. It all comes down to who has the most tools. And certs are one tool there is no reason to leave out.

mityay
02-04-2008, 06:07 PM
Thanks for reply guys, and sorry for stealing you tread Liamemz.

As I understand, if you go it alone then you don't really need any cert's but they wouldnt hurt. But what if I want to be an employee and have a career in IT? Bachelor would be the choice, right? Cert's at that point are just sweeteners and dont really mean much. What do you guys think?

IcedFalcon
03-03-2008, 05:33 AM
Qualifications are goo as long as you plan on being an employee.
Generally from my own experience having a good basic understanding of most things and a futher indepth knowledge ina particual field (for me its excellent customer service, there are so many it repair guys near me with bad reps)

Well said! exactly the point I wanted to make. In most areas service is 3/4 of business. You may not be able to help the customer but if you get them the help they need along with a few business cards you will most likely get their recommendation to friends and family.

As for certifications I am A+, CCNA, and MCSE trained but not certified. I worked for 6 months in a back room during high school before I earned my stripes. I have seen people strut around with their certifications and immediately go down in flames because all of the studying only applied for the test. That said if I am applying for a contract I always note that if the client requests I can take the certification.