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View Full Version : is there some software to backup *.doc *.xls *.jpg automaticaly?


gabak
05-08-2010, 07:42 PM
i want a software so when a customer bring me a computer then i connect the hdd to my computer i dont have to make a huge research to see where the customer has all his data.

ATTech
05-08-2010, 08:13 PM
Ask them if they have specifically saved anything outside of the default places (My Docs, Desktop and Favs).

If they have, have them specify where.

The problem with having software that automatically backs up by file type, is that you'll get A LOT of useless stuff backed up.

DCGPX
05-08-2010, 08:28 PM
i want a software so when a customer bring me a computer then i connect the hdd to my computer i dont have to make a huge research to see where the customer has all his data.

This is why most of us have a disclaimer saying its the clients responsibility to back up. If they havent then personally I ask where do they want backed up and its stipulated on work order. Thats all I back up.

As an aside though I do a full image as standard if its a base repair and say its on my server for 7 days after which its gone and sorry if they missed something.

mh348
05-08-2010, 09:07 PM
Ask them if they have specifically saved anything outside of the default places (My Docs, Desktop and Favs).

If they have, have them specify where.

The problem with having software that automatically backs up by file type, is that you'll get A LOT of useless stuff backed up.

Agreed, Make a form that they can fill in, stating what needs to be backed up, and make them sign...

By default you should backup, my docs (or the entire docs & settings folder / user folder), which in most cases will include docs, favs, desktop emails etc

Also check there PC for apps that might have data stored in the c: drive or in the programs folder... For example an Accounting App that might have data stored in the Program folder..

Pc Fixed Right
05-08-2010, 09:48 PM
you can always use fabs autobackup tool that has been mentioned alot it will save you lots of time

Vicenarian
05-08-2010, 10:11 PM
you can always use fabs autobackup tool that has been mentioned alot it will save you lots of time

+1 GREAT TOOL...for only like $6.75 too

iisjman07
05-08-2010, 11:05 PM
http://www.myharddrivedied.com/files/X-ForensicStrategyUtils/X-Forensic%20Strategy%20Slurp/

This is some free software called 'FSSlurp' (short for Forensic Slurp). Run that from the customers windows environment and it'll scan the entire drive for .doc, .ppt, .url, .xls, and .pdf files. It'll back them up on the same folder where it is stored, so you can use a flash drive although it may be slow because of transfer speeds. You could always make a little batch file that scans the drive for .jpg files and copies them, or just use the Windows Search utility

gabak
05-09-2010, 05:00 AM
well , something people dont know what they have then say simple say , save all.
If you ask them where is your data , they simple dont know. ( some of them others they know what they have and where it is).

my idea was something that will search in a quick way for what it matters.
i m linux fans so it somebody know an linux software that will be better , otherwise i ll go back to xp.

I have read one guy say he simple makes an image from the whole hdd , that surely takes a lot of time plus a lot hdd speace!! ( plus what do u use to do that? ghost symantec? clonezilla? after that will u unzip that hug file so customer will download from ftp server what he needs?

PR Tech
05-09-2010, 05:37 AM
I like Acronis for making disk images. It lets you easily work with permissions. We have several internal SATA drives where the initial backup goes. Then it gets moved from the internal drives to external USB hard drives after about a month or so. We probably keep backups for 4-6 months...a long time, but has been worth it on several occasions now.

iisjman07
05-09-2010, 09:32 AM
4-6 months.

Lol, we only keep them for 4 weeks :rolleyes:

NeutronTech
05-09-2010, 10:55 AM
Are there any legal implications to holding a backup of a customer's machine? I mean, we are keeping a copy of all their personal information without their permission. We're not abusing that, but what if someone were to break in and steal all of that?

iisjman07
05-09-2010, 01:11 PM
Are there any legal implications to holding a backup of a customer's machine? I mean, we are keeping a copy of all their personal information without their permission. We're not abusing that, but what if someone were to break in and steal all of that?

Well customers come back complaining that XXX documents isn't there any more (even though it was thoroughly explained everything would be removed) and want it back far more frequently then we're burgled. If it was a concern that we may be robbed, I'd use truecypt's full disk encryption on the drives, making them useless if you don't know the key. To be honest, there's no way round it: customers expect you to give them their data for their stupidity, but wouldn't want a backup of all their private files, and I just clone the drives because it's easier. I even once had a customer come in within 4 weeks of their last repair with a dead hard drive, and wanted their photos recovered. The drive was completely dead, but luckily we had their 4 week old clone and managed to get all the data back easily...

ProTech-MN
05-09-2010, 05:07 PM
Are there any legal implications to holding a backup of a customer's machine? I mean, we are keeping a copy of all their personal information without their permission. We're not abusing that, but what if someone were to break in and steal all of that?

It does pose an interesting dilemma... and I'm sure that we're all guilty of this practice at one point or another. I would say that with all the focus now days with regards to peoples private data, that there could very well be some legal implications surrounding this, especially if the customer was not informed & agreed to it.

Look at it from the other side - how would you feel if were your data? I know that I would be incredibly angry if I found out about this having been done without my knowledge or permission.

All it really takes is that one ticked-off customer who decides to take some kind of action against you regarding this & it could end up costing you a lot of time and money - whether you win the case or not. I think the smart play here is to CYA. Make sure customer's know what you keep/don't keep, encrypt their data, etc. and that they're signing off on it.

-Randy

DCGPX
05-09-2010, 09:37 PM
It does pose an interesting dilemma... and I'm sure that we're all guilty of this practice at one point or another. I would say that with all the focus now days with regards to peoples private data, that there could very well be some legal implications surrounding this, especially if the customer was not informed & agreed to it.

Look at it from the other side - how would you feel if were your data? I know that I would be incredibly angry if I found out about this having been done without my knowledge or permission.

All it really takes is that one ticked-off customer who decides to take some kind of action against you regarding this & it could end up costing you a lot of time and money - whether you win the case or not. I think the smart play here is to CYA. Make sure customer's know what you keep/don't keep, encrypt their data, etc. and that they're signing off on it.

-Randy

Hmmm... rethinking this, I guess my work orders now changing to include statement that I may do a full backup for repair purposes and keep it for xx days. By time I explain that if not and as at times PC repair is akin to surgery and can go wrong its in their best interest to let me.

Pretty sure Data Protection Act(in UK anyway) allows this if its in course of your business and not used for other purposes outside of it

As for being burgled my server is in an attic surrounded by years of junk, even I dread trying to get near it, let alone a robber:D:D

Vicenarian
05-11-2010, 02:10 AM
going to add a "data backup" waver for my business :) Thanks guys.