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View Full Version : Whats specs do you consider old. (junk)


hondablaster
11-22-2009, 10:36 PM
In my tech class alot of the students bring in what I consider junk PCs and fix them up. In thier minds its a fast computer. I understand my desire to build fast PCs gives a me a scewed view of PC hardware so I figure Ill poll what are your thoughts. What is an old PC that you would recommend to a client its time to upgrade.

When I see a PC with any P4 < 3000 mhz and < 80GB < 512 Ram @ DDR < 400. Intergrated graphics.

I dont like the later p4 series simply because they use lots of electricity and run HOT!

JosephLeo
11-22-2009, 10:59 PM
I don't like the word "junk" since people in developing nations would be more than happy with it. I like to use the word "Deprecated" since it sounds nicer and is fun to say, not to mention it impresses people.

But to me it all depends on the OS that it's running. By default anything older than XP is deprecated.

If the system is XP then anything with less than the following specs isn't good to me, meaning these are the absolute minimum specs in my opinion.
CPU: Intel Celeron (Tualatin), AMD Duron & Geode.
Memory: 64MB DDR 133MHz
HDD: 8GB IDE

If the system is Windows Vista or Windows 7 then the absolute minimum specs are as follows.
CPU: Intel Celeron (Prescott), AMD Sempron (Thoroughbred)
Memory: 512MB DDR2 400MHz
HDD: 40GB IDE

Remember, these are my ABSOLUTE minimum. I would recommend double the horsepower for an actual minimum, and quadruple for an everyday use scenario.

hondablaster
11-22-2009, 11:09 PM
Wow Joseph you make what I called depreciated seem like high end gear. LOL

I understand one mans junk is another mans treasure. And you guys wouldnt be in business if you just recommended new PCs.

I guess my "junk" is sorta elitist. I figure if I cant add hardware to a PC for less than the price of a new one why fix it up. Thats sorta where I get my specs. I can get 1gb ram DDRI 400 for $35 or 2GB DDRII 800 for $35 you start comparing stuff and sooner or later your up to the price of a low end new PC. :eek:

About the only thing I could recommend to someone who wants to use legacy stuff is to add RAM and get a bigger HDD and that is if its P4 > 2.0ghz When you start adding graphics, firewire cards, or USB hubs etc. I stay go buy a new one.

JosephLeo
11-22-2009, 11:20 PM
Wow Joseph you make what I called depreciated seem like high end gear.

Well, those are my absolute minimum specs. That means it's good enough for running one application, and some basic security software and you only use the computer to get on the internet once in a while. Meaning a "Grannies PC"

My real-life minimum specs are twice that, and my every-day use specs are quadrupled of my absolute minimum specs, entertainment would be around the 6 to 8 times area, and then big task like gaming and media editing are in the 8 to 12 times area.

You're junk specs are in fact a little "elitist" being that you still see those specs in some computers only about 2 or 3 years old, and modern day netbooks. I'm not saying you're going to get very far with those specs either, but 80GB is a lot of space believe it or not, and P4's are still considered "powerful"...DDR 2 Memory isn't even phased out yet either- so even if it's 400MHz it's still not bad.

NYJimbo
11-22-2009, 11:20 PM
XP systems with :

Less than 512mg ram
Less than 40gb drive
Less than Athlon or Celeron CPU
Less than 64mg video card

Vista / 7 with:

Less than 2 gb ram
Less than 80gb drive
Less than 2 core procs or high end single cores
Less than 256mg video card (with gpu)

I stopped screwing around with pathetic machines a long time ago. If a customer brings in an ancient toy I tell them that in a very friendly and respectful way, but I do tell them that.

JosephLeo
11-22-2009, 11:24 PM
I stopped screwing around with pathetic machines a long time ago. If a customer brings in an ancient toy I tell them that in a very friendly and respectful way, but I do tell them that.

I would never turn away work. If A customer wants me to run anti-virus on a 10 year old Windows ME machine and I can't pursuade them into a cheaper solution like buying an intel Atom machine then by God I will remove that virus on that 10-year old Windows ME machine....of course I won't remove it on the machine itself, instead I will slave it up to my own bench and then remove it via virtual machine ;)

studiot
11-22-2009, 11:26 PM
These 'pathetic' or 'depracated' machines are the ones most likely to be in need of our repair services.

Will not the latest and greatest still be under guarantee?

NYJimbo
11-22-2009, 11:31 PM
I would never turn away work. If A customer wants me to run anti-virus on a 10 year old Windows ME machine and I can't pursuade them into a cheaper solution like buying an intel Atom machine then by God I will remove that virus on that 10-year old Windows ME machine....of course I won't remove it on the machine itself, instead I will slave it up to my own bench and then remove it via virtual machine ;)

Wow, I would not do that for some simple reasons, there are so few people running those kind of machines and I dont need to get "down and dirty" working on them to stay in business. It's just not worth the work when I look at the profits on such a job.

Tommorow, Monday the 23rd, I already have one machine coming in for viruses, one for a solder job on a netbook to allow it to run a hard drive and another for a failing hard drive which needs a cloning and some minor O/S file restores. All of these machines run XP or Vista and are much easier to work with. Why kill myself with "ancient" crap, I send it somewhere else.

NYJimbo
11-22-2009, 11:35 PM
These 'pathetic' or 'depracated' machines are the ones most likely to be in need of our repair services.

Will not the latest and greatest still be under guarantee?

Well, define "latest and greatest" ? I mean I get machines every day with dual core centrinos or 1-2 gigs of ram and 160gb drives that came off warranty a year or more ago.

The 'pathetic' or 'deprecated' machines, by my definition, have been off warranty by more then 2-3 years (not including extended warrantees).

hondablaster
11-22-2009, 11:45 PM
Im in the frame of mind I rather try to sell a newer PC first and do a file transfer and optimize of some sort. I also have been noticing (well I do far more reading here than posting) that people who try to keep very old legacy machines alive tend to be clients that a successful tech might not want to have (Depending on your situation of course) They will nickel and dime your services and then your going to spend extra time fixing a PC that is slow to respond. Its a snowball effect to a degree. :eek:

BTW I dont want to look like some snob if someone gave me A PC with the max spec I originally listed I would not be afraid to work on it. Keep in mind the greater than or less than > < symbols. :p

studiot
11-23-2009, 12:11 AM
OK, here's a question.

I have a good client, a light engineering works - This last couple of years I have helped them upgrade from some sort of dog's dinner to all Vista or Mac.
We have also had some consultancy work on vibration meausrement and analysis from them.

The boss is an avid campanologist.
The pc he gave to his local church a while ago has just failed.

It's only purpose is to run one particular program which shows the changes to the ringers, on a screen. The dead pc, and therefore their program, ran on Windows 3.1.

What should I replace it with?

As a matter of interest the engineering involved in designing and fitting the sensors to the bells was more interesting than the pc itself.

hondablaster
11-23-2009, 12:22 AM
OK, here's a question.

I have a good client, a light engineering works - This last couple of years I have helped them upgrade from some sort of dog's dinner to all Vista or Mac.
We have also had some consultancy work on vibration meausrement and analysis from them.

The boss is an avid campanologist.
The pc he gave to his local church a while ago has just failed.

It's only purpose is to run one particular program which shows the changes to the ringers, on a screen. The dead pc, and therefore their program, ran on Windows 3.1.

What should I replace it with?

As a matter of interest the engineering involved in designing and fitting the sensors to the bells was more interesting than the pc itself.


There will always be those situations. There are no absolutes. Its ultimatley up to you.

gunslinger
11-23-2009, 06:21 AM
My office computer is a Dell 2400 with a 2.6 GHz P4 and 768 mb of RAM and it will still blow away about 80% of the Vista boxes that come through my door.

I think any system not running XP or not able to run it well is junk and not worth fixing in most cases. My kids desktop system is right on the line with a P4 1.5 GHz and 512 RAM.

Its somewhat different with a Mac because the OS can do more with less, same with Linux boxes.

Blues
11-23-2009, 02:37 PM
OK, here's a question.

I have a good client, a light engineering works - This last couple of years I have helped them upgrade from some sort of dog's dinner to all Vista or Mac.
We have also had some consultancy work on vibration meausrement and analysis from them.

The boss is an avid campanologist.
The pc he gave to his local church a while ago has just failed.

It's only purpose is to run one particular program which shows the changes to the ringers, on a screen. The dead pc, and therefore their program, ran on Windows 3.1.

What should I replace it with?

As a matter of interest the engineering involved in designing and fitting the sensors to the bells was more interesting than the pc itself.

Depending on costs it might be something that could be done in a VM to keep compatibility. I will work on what they want worked on when I do side jobs but if a new system would be better I will recomend it but it is thier time and money they can spend it how they want.

andrewrost3241981
11-23-2009, 03:22 PM
My personal opinion:
CPU: less than a P4 or equivalent processor (or at least one that doesn't use a 478 slot or newer)
RAM: pc 100/133 or lower ram
Video Card: AGP x4 slot or lower
HD: less than 40GB

studiot
11-23-2009, 04:36 PM
Depending on costs it might be something that could be done in a VM to keep compatibility.

And just what would I run a VM on in a remote belfry, pray?

Doctor Micro
11-25-2009, 03:23 AM
My benchmark and advice for most users with ancient hardware is simple: if it needs anything more than a simple tuneup or virus removal, has an "Intel Pentium Inside" sticker and a "Made for Windows 95" sticker, it's time to put the old girl out to pasture, unless they have a compelling reason not to.

Blues
11-25-2009, 02:44 PM
And just what would I run a VM on in a remote belfry, pray?

I was saying if it were more cost effective to get a replacement machine and run VMWare or other free VM software. If the app can still work with what ever external devices it needs to. Im not saying a VM on a new machine would be the answer. I am saying that VMs open a new avenue to look down when hit with older equipment that has failing hardware.