Computer Processor Codenames: What the processors are and the inspiration behind the names.

In the computer industry there are plenty of buzzwords that get slung about when talking about the next generation of computer hardware and CPU codenames are quite possibly the hardest to keep track of due to the sheer amount of them. We have put together this list with the codename of each of the existing AMD and Intel processors.

So what is the purpose of all the codenames? Well, it allows the chip companies to talk about their upcoming CPU’s without actually talking about them. The chip companies let slip the barebones facts about the chips, give it a codename and let the computer hardware geeks speculate and ask questions which makes for great material to write about in the hardware industry.

Why the weird names? It seems most of Intels processors codenames are inspired by local geography of the Pacific Northwest of America. Alaska, Deerfield, Foster, Gallatin, Northwood, Montana, Madison and McKinley are rivers in Alaska, California, Montana, Massachusetts and Vermont.

The early series of AMD processors (eg. K5, K6-2) had their name inspired by Kryptonite which is a fictional element from Superman comicbooks (Im assuming this was set up to sound like AMD is Intels kryptonite?). Some of the later AMD series were inspired by sports cars (eg. Corvette, Mustang). Now that is cleared up, on to the list.

AMD Codenames Processor
Description
Socket/Slot
X5 5×86-133 Socket 3
SSA5 K5 (original PR75-PR100) Socket 5, 7
5k86 K5 (newer PR120-PR200) Socket 7
K6 The Original AMD K6 core (cancelled) n/a
NX686 NexGen K6 Core which became the K6 Socket 7
Littlefoot 0.25µm K6 Socket 7
Chompers K6-2 Socket 7, Super 7
Sharptooth K6-3 Super 7
Argon Previously K7 n/a
K7 Athlon Slot A
K75 0.18µm Athlon Slot A
K76 0.18µm Athlon (with copper interconnects) Slot A
K8 Athlon 64
Thunderbird Athlon Slot A, Socket A
Mustang Athlon with a large L2 cache (cancelled) n/a
Corvette Previously mobile Athlon (now Palomino) n/a
Palomino 0.180.18µm Athlon XP/MP, Mobile Athlon 4 Socket A
Thoroughbred-A 0.13µm Athlon XP/MP 1700-2100+ Socket A
Thoroughbred-B 0.13µm Athlon XP/MP 1700-2400+, 2600-2800+, Semperon 2200-2800+ Socket A
Barton 0.13µm Athlon XP/MP 1700-2100+ Socket A
Thorton Athlon XP (256KB L2 cache) Socket A
Spitfire Duron Socket A
Camaro Previously Morgan
Morgan Mobile Duron & Mobile 7 Duron 900MHz – 1.3GHz Socket A
Applebread Duron 1.4 – 1.8GHz
Appaloosa 0.13µ Morgan Socket A
ClawHammer Athlon 64 (64bit) Socket 754 & Socket 939
ClawHammer DP Early name for the now Opteron DP Socket 940
Newcastle Althon 64 Socket 754 & Socket 939
Winchester 0.09µ Athlon 64 Socket 939
San Diego 0.09µ Athlon 64 and the Athlon 64 FX with SSE3 extensions Socket 939
Venice 0.09µ Athlon 64 with SSE3 extensions Socket 939
Odessa 0.09µ Mobile-version Athlon 64
Manchester Athlon 64 X2 with 512KB L2 cache and SSE3 extensions Socket 939
Toledo Athlon 64 X2 with 1024KB L2 cache and SSE3
extensions
Socket 939
SledgeHammer Opteron with a large L2 cache Socket 940
Palermo 0.09µ Sempron Socket 754
Paris Sempron Socket 754
Oakville Mobile Athlon 64 and Sempron Socket 754
Windsor Athlon 64 X2 and Athlon 64 FX-62 Socket M2
Orleans Athlon 64 Socket M2
Manila Sempron Socket M2

 

Intel
Codenames
Processor Description Socket/Slot
P23 486SX Socket 1, 2, 3
P23S 486SX SL-Enhanced Socket 1, 2, 3
P23N 487SX (coprocessor) Socket 1
P4 486DX Socket 1, 2, 3
P4S 486DX  SL-Enhanced Socket 1, 2, 3
P24 486DX2 Socket 1, 2, 3
P24S 486DX2  SL-Enhanced Socket 1, 2, 3
P24D 486DX2 (with write-back cache) Socket 3
P24C 486DX4 Socket 3
P23T 486DXODP (486 Overdrive) Socket 3
P4T 486ODPR (486 Overdrive) Socket 1, 2, 3
P24T PODP5V (486 Overdrive) Socket 2, 3
P24CT Pentium Overdrive 3.3v Socket  2, 3
P5 Pentium 60/66MHz Socket 4
P5T Pentium Overdrive 120/133MHz Socket 4
P54C Pentium 75MHz – 120MHz Socket 5, 7
P54CQS Pentium 120MHz – 133MHz Socket 5,7
P54CS Pentium 120MHz – 200MHz Socket 7
P54CT(A) Pentium Overdrive Socket 5, 7
P55C Pentium MMX Socket 7
P54CTB Pentium Overdrive MMX Socket 5, 7
Tillamook Mobile Pentium MMX Mobile Module
P6 Pentium Pro Socket 8
P6T Pentium II Overdrive Socket 8
Klamath 0.35µm Pentium II Slot 1
Deschutes 0.25µm Pentium II Slot 1
Drake 0.25µm Pentium II Xeon Slot 2
Tonga Mobile Pentium II Mobile Module
Covington Celeron (Pentium II without cache) Slot 1
Mendocino 0.25µm Celeron with 128KB on-die L2 cache Slot 1, Socket 370
Dixon Mobile Pentium II with 256KB on-die L2 Mobile Module
Katmai 0.25µm Pentium III with SSE Slot 1
Tanner 0.25µm Pentium III Xeon with SSE Slot 2
Coppermine 0.18µm Pentium III with on-die L2 cache Slot 1, Socket 370
Tualatin 0.13µm Pentium III Socket 370
Coppermine-T 0.18µm Pentium III with Tualatin Voltage Socket 370
Cascades 0.18µm Pentium III Xeon Slot 2
Coppermine-128 0.18µm Celeron with 128KB L2 Socket 370
Timna Mobile Celeron with DRAM controller (cancelled) n/a
P68 Willamette n/a
Willamette 0.18µm Pentium 4 Socket 423, 478
Northwood 0.13µm Pentium 4 Socket 478
Prescott 0.09µm Pentium 4 with HyperThreading, Celeron D (Sockett 478), Celeron D (socket 775) Socket 775
Smithfield Pentium D, Pentium Extreme Edition Socket 775
Presler 0.065µm Pentium D
Conroe 0.065µm Pentium D (with reduced power consumption)
Banias 130nm Pentium M with 1MB L2 cache
Yonah Dual Core Pentium M and Single Core Celeron M
Merom 64bit version of the Yonah
Foster Xeon DP Socket 603
Foster MP Xeon MP Socket 603
Prestonia 0.13µm Xeon DP Socket 603
Gallatin 0.13µm Xeon MP Socket 603
Nocona 0.09µm Xeon (Socket 603) and Pentium 4 Extreme Edition (Socket 478 and Socket 775
Dothan 90nm Pentium M with 2MB L2 cache
P7 Previously Merced (Itanium)
Merced Itanium PAC 418
McKinley Itanium 2 with 3MB on-die L3 cache PAC 418
Madison 0.13µm Itanium 2
Deerfield Low cost Madison
Montecito 0.09µm Madison
Shavano Future Itanium family chip (Itanium 3?)
Dimona Future Itanium family chip (Itanium 3?)
Tukwila Future Itanium family chip (Itanium 3?)

Intel Core2 Duo E6600, 2.4 GHz E6600 (BX805576600) Processor



Bryce Whitty

About the Author

Bryce Whitty
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Bryce is an Australian computer technician and the founder of Technibble. He started his computer repair business when he was 17 years old and is still running it 9 years later. He is an avid traveller and spends at least a month of the year in another country.

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